Duraroha, Dur-aroha, Durārohā, Durāroha: 8 definitions

Introduction

Duraroha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (D) next»] — Duraroha in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Durāroha (दुरारोह) is the name of an Asura king, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 45. Accordingly: “... And then Prahlāda invited, by means of messengers, the chiefs of the Asuras, and they came there in order from all the underworlds. First came King Bali, accompanied by innumerable great Asuras. Close behind him came Amīla and the brave Durāroha and Sumāya, and Tantukaccha, and Vikaṭākṣa and Prakampana, and Dhūmaketu and Mahāmāya, and the other lords of the Asuras; each of these came accompanied by a thousand feudal chiefs. The hall of audience was filled with the heroes, who saluted one another, and after they had sat down in order of rank Prahlāda honoured them all”.

The story of Durāroha was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Durāroha, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Durārohā (दुरारोहा) refers to the “bhūmi difficult of access” and represents one of the ten Bodhisattva grounds (bodhisattabhūmi), according to the Mahāvastu referring to a Daśabhūmikasūtra, as mentioned in the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter 52.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Durāroha (दुरारोह).—a. difficult of ascent. (-haḥ) 1 The cocoanut tree.

2) the palm tree.

3) the date tree.

Durāroha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dur and āroha (आरोह).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Durāroha (दुरारोह).—name of a cakravartin: Mahāvastu i.154.2; and Durārohā, a name for the first bodhisattva-bhūmi: Mahāvastu i.76.13; 90.13. Cf. Dūrāroha-buddhi. I think it probable that Dūrāroha (dūra, far, plus āroha, q.v., height or length) is the true reading in all these cases.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durāroha (दुरारोह).—mfn.

(-haḥ-hā-haṃ) Of difficult ascent. m.

(-haḥ) 1. The palm tree. 2. The date tree. f.

(-hā) The silk cotton tree. E. dur with difficulty, āroha to be ascended, from ruh to rise, with āṅ prefixed, affixes khal and ṭāp .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durāroha (दुरारोह).—adj., f. , hard to be ascended, [Rāmāyaṇa] 2, 105, 6.

Durāroha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dus and āroha (आरोह).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durāroha (दुरारोह).—[adjective] difficult to be ascended.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Durāroha (दुरारोह):—[=dur-āroha] [from dur] mfn. d° to be ascended, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] (-tā f., [Kādambarī])

2) [v.s. ...] m. the palm or date tree, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) Durārohā (दुरारोहा):—[=dur-ārohā] [from dur-āroha > dur] f. the silk-cotton tree, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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