Angaja, aka: Aṅgajā, Anga-ja; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Angaja means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Angaja in Purana glossary... « previous · [A] · next »

Aṅgajā (अङ्गजा).—A daughter of Brahmā.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 3. 12.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Aṅgaja.—(EI 16), same as the god Kāma. Note: aṅgaja is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

aṅgaja (अंगज).—a m (S a f) Produced from one's body; one's son, one's daughter.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

aṅgaja (अंगज).—a m One's son. aṅgajā a f One's daughter.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Aṅgaja (अङ्गज).—a. [aṅgāt jāyate jan-ḍa]

1) produced from or on the body, being in or on the body, bodily; °जं रजः, °जाः अलङ्काराः (jaṃ rajaḥ, °jāḥ alaṅkārāḥ) &c.

2) produced by a supplementary rite.

3) beautiful, ornamental.

-jaḥ

Aṅgaja is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms aṅga and ja (ज). See also (synonyms): aṅgajāta.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Aṅgaja (अङ्गज).—mfn.

(-jaḥ-jā-jaṃ) 1. Produced or born of the body. n.

(-jaṃ) 1. Blood. 2. Love. desire. 3. The hair of the head. 4. Sickness, disease. 5. A son f.

(-jā) A daughter. E. aṅga the body, and ja what is born also similar compounds, as aṅgajāta, aṅgajanma, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 1625 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Anga
Aṅga (अङ्ग).—(1) member, part (as in Sanskrit and Pali, where it is recorded as nt. only), m. ...
Sahaja
Sahajā (सहजा, “natural”) refers to one of the two types of pratibhā (poetic intuition) accordin...
Kutaja
Kuṭaja (कुटज).—1) Name of a tree; Māl.9.15; Me.4; R.19.37; Ṛs.3.13; Bh.1.35. 2) Name of Agastya...
Khatvanga
Khaṭvāṅga (खट्वाङ्ग).—General Information. A King of the Ikṣvāku dynasty, known by the name Dil...
Andaja
Aṇḍaja (अण्डज).—a.. [अण्डात जायते (aṇḍāta jāyate); जन्-ड (jan-ḍa) born from an egg. रोमजं वालजं...
Svedaja
Svedaja (स्वेदज).—An asura (demon). (See under Raktaja).
Vedanga
Vedāṅga (वेदाङ्ग) refers to a category of Apaurūṣeya texts, or “disciplines dealing with knowle...
Upanga
Upāṅga (उपाङ्ग) refers to the “subsidiary limbs” and represents one of the three types of Āṅgik...
Pancanga
Pañcāṅga.—(CII 3), the Hindu almanac; in the Deccan and in some other parts, the pañcāṅgas are ...
Dvija
Dvija (द्विज).—mfn. (-jaḥ-jā-jaṃ) 1. Twice born. 2. Oviparous. m. (-jaḥ) 1. A man of either of ...
Manuja
Manuja (मनुज).—a man, mankind. °अधिपः, °अधिपतिः, °ईश्वरः, °पतिः, °राजः (adhipaḥ, °adhipatiḥ, °ī...
Jarayuja
Jarāyuja (जरायुज).—a. born from the womb, viviparous; Ms.1.43. and Malli. on Ku.3.42.Jarāyuja i...
Saraja
Śaraja (शरज).—n. (-jaṃ) Butter made from milk one day old. E. śara cream, ja born.--- OR --- Sa...
Saroja
Saroja (सरोज).—n., Derivable forms: sarojam (सरोजम्).Saroja is a Sanskrit compound consisting o...
Caturanga
Caturaṅga.—(EI 2), a complete army. Note: caturaṅga is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glos...

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