Anahara, Anāhāra: 16 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Anahara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Anāhāra (अनाहार) refers to a “fast”, mentioned in verse 4.18 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] Erysipelas, urticaria, leprosy itching of the eyes, jaundice, and fever as well as cough, dyspnea, palpitation of the heart, freckles of the face, and swellings of the skin (result) from (suppressed) vomiting. A gargle, an inhalant, a fast [viz., anāhāra], after one has eaten pungent (food)—its ejection, gymnastics, a bloodletting, and a purgative (are) commended in this case”.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Anāhāra.—‘unresumable’ (Ind. Ep., p. 395), cf. anācchedya. Note: anāhāra is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Anahara in Pali glossary
Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Anāhāra, (adj.) (an + āhāra) being without food M.I, 487; Sn.985. (Page 33)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

anāhāra (अनाहार).—m (S) Abstinence from food; fasting.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

anāhāra (अनाहार).—m Fasting. anāhārī a That fasts.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Anāhāra (अनाहार).—a. Abstaining from food, fasting.

-raḥ 1 Abstinence from food, fasting; अनाहारेणात्मानं व्यापाद- यिष्यामि (anāhāreṇātmānaṃ vyāpāda- yiṣyāmi) H.1.

2) Non-production.

3) Non-seizure.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Anāhāra (अनाहार).—n.

(-raṃ) 1. Abstinence, starvation. 2. Non-production. 3. Nonseizure. E. an neg. āhāra food, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Anāhāra (अनाहार).—I. m. non-eating, [Hitopadeśa] 24, 12. Ii. adj. one who abstains from eating, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 75, 30. Ekāhāra, i. e. eka-āhāra, adj. eating only once a day, Mahābhārata 13, 5159.

Anāhāra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms an and āhāra (आहार).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Anāhāra (अनाहार):—[=an-āhāra] m. not taking food, abstinence, non-seizure

2) [v.s. ...] non-production

3) [v.s. ...] mfn. one who abstains from food.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Anāhāra (अनाहार):—I. [tatpurusha compound] m.

(-raḥ) 1) Abstinence, starvation.

2) Non-seizure. E. a neg. and āhāra. Ii. [bahuvrihi compound] m. f. n.

(-raḥ-rā-ram) Not taking food. E. a priv. and āhāra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Anāhāra (अनाहार):—[anā+hāra] (raḥ) 1. m. Abstinence.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Anāhāra (अनाहार) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Aṇāhāra.

[Sanskrit to German]

Anahara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Anahara in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Anāhāra (अनाहार) [Also spelled anahar]:—(a) without food.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Aṇāhāra (अणाहार) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Anāhāra.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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