Smritindriya, aka: Smṛtīndriya, Smriti-indriya; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Smritindriya means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Smṛtīndriya can be transliterated into English as Smrtindriya or Smritindriya, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[Smritindriya in Mahayana glossaries]

Smṛtīndriya (स्मृतीन्द्रिय) refers to the “faculty of mindfulness” and represents one of the five faculties (pañcendriya) forming part of the thirty-seven auxiliaries to enlightenment (bodhipākṣika), according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter XXXI.—Accordingly, “he constantly thinks about the Bodhi of the Buddhas and does not think about anything else: this is called the ‘faculty of mindfulness’ (smṛtīndriya)”.

Also, “when he thinks about the Path and the dharmas adjuvant to the Path and does not think of anything else, that is the faculty of memory (smṛtīndriya)”.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of smritindriya or smrtindriya in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Buddhism)

[Smritindriya in Buddhism glossaries]

Smṛtīndriya (स्मृतीन्द्रिय) or simply Smṛti refers to the “faculty of mindfulness” and represents one of the “five faculties” (pañcendriya) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 47), itself forming part of the “thirty-seven things on the side of awakening” (bodhipākṣika-dharma). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (eg., smṛti-indriya). The work is attributed to Nagarjuna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

Relevant definitions

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