Samvat, Saṃvat, Shamvat: 8 definitions

Introduction

Samvat means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Saṃvat.—(IE 8-1), originally an abbreviation of saṃvatsara (a year) or any of its declensional cases that can be used in ex- pressing a date; later stereotyped in the sense of ‘a year’ or ‘an era’. It was generally regarded as indeclinable; but we have some cases of the use of forms with case-endings, e. g., saṃvataḥ, saṃvatā, saṃvati and saṃvatām. See also saṃvate (IE 8-1), the seventh case-ending of saṃvata, a corrupt form of saṃvat. Since the late medieval age, the word specially indi- cates the Vikrama era, although originally it was used with the name of any reckoning in quoting the dates of records, especially the regnal reckoning. The word is used in inscriptions in a large number of corrupt forms, e. g., samvata, samvatta, samata, samanta, samatta, saṃmat, samasta, smat, samvatu, samvatū, etc., etc. Note: saṃvat is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Samvat.—(IE 8-1), mistake for saṃvat, originally an abbre- viation of saṃvatsara. Note: samvat is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

saṃvat (संवत्) [or संवद्, saṃvad].—m (S) A year; esp. a year of Wikramaditya. This era commenced 57 years before Christ.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

saṃvat (संवत्) [-da, -द].—m A year; esp. a year of vikramāditya.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Saṃvat (संवत्).—ind.

1) A year.

2) Especially a year of the Vikramāditya era (commencing 56 years before the Christian era).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃvat (संवत्).—Ind. 1. A year. 2. A year of Vikramaditya's era.

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Saṃvāt (संवात्).—mfn. (-vān-vātī or vāntī vāt) Blowing, breathing, (as wind.) E. sam before to blow, śatṛ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃvat (संवत्).—probably sam-*vat (cf. parut), indecl. 1. A year. 2. A year of Vikramāditya’s era.

— Cf.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃvat (संवत्).—1. [feminine] side, stretch, streak.

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Saṃvat (संवत्).—2. abbrev. for saṃvatsare in the year (of Vikrama's era, 56 B.[Causative]).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śaṃvat (शंवत्):—[=śaṃ-vat] [from śaṃ > śam] mfn. (śaṃ-) auspicious, prosperous, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] containing the word śam, [Catalogue(s)]

3) Śamvat (शम्वत्):—śamva, śamvat [wrong reading] for śamba and śaṃvat.

4) Saṃvat (संवत्):—[=saṃ-vat] 1. saṃ-vat f. ([from] 2. sam; cf. ni-vat, pra-vat) a side, region, tract, [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda]

5) [v.s. ...] = saṃgrāma, [Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska ii, 17.]

6) [v.s. ...] 2. saṃ-vat ind. (a contraction of saṃ-vatsara below) a year, in the year (in later times [especially] of the Vikrama era [beginning in 58 B.[Calcutta edition] See vikramāditya] as opp. to the Śaka era [in modern times supposed to be founded by Śāli-vāhana; See 3. śaka]; sometimes = ‘in the year of the reign of’), [Inscriptions] etc., [Indian Wisdom, by Sir M. Monier-Williams 494.]

7) [=saṃ-vat] 3. saṃ-vat mfn. containing the word sam, [Śāṅkhāyana-brāhmaṇa]

8) [v.s. ...] n. Name of a Sāman, [Pañcaviṃśa-brāhmaṇa]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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