Punyakarman, Puṇyakarman, Puṇyakarma, Punya-karman, Punyakarma, Punya-karman: 12 definitions

Introduction:

Punyakarman means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Punyakarman in Shaivism glossary
Source: Himalayan Academy: Dancing with Siva

Puṇyakarma (पुण्यकर्म) or Sukarma refers to “benevolent actions”, which will bring loving reactions. Selfish, hateful acts (pāpakarma or kukarma) will bring suffering. Karma (“action”, “deed”) is a neutral, self-perpetuating law of the inner cosmos, much as gravity is an impersonal law of the outer cosmos. In fact, it has been said that gravity is a small, external expression of the greater law of karma. The impelling, unseen power of one’s past actions is called adṛṣṭa.

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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Punyakarman in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Puṇyakarman (पुण्यकर्मन्) refers to “performing auspicious work”, according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, as the Lord said to Bhadrakālī: “[...] Today, I am one who has done auspicious work [i.e., puṇyakarman]. Today I am Śaṃkara and Śiva. I have seen a divine energy: Dakṣa's daughter, in (her) youth. I have become distraught and mad by that second very powerful curse. Thus, today, I have seen you; (so, I have become) a great Siddha. (I have) experienced you as (my) wife for seven births, age after age”.

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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Punyakarman in Mahayana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Puṇyakarman (पुण्यकर्मन्) refers to “meritorious actions” (of the Bodhisattva), according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter 22, v2).—Accordingly, “In all his births, the Bodhisattva is born apparitionally.—(a) According to some, the Bodhisattva mounted on a white elephant, surrounded, venerated, respected, esteemed and served by innumerable Tuṣita gods, penetrated along with them into the belly of his mother.—(b) According to others, the Bodhisattva’s mother, possessing the concentration like a magic show caused her belly to expand inordinately; all the Bodhisattvas of the trisāhasramahāsāhasradlokadhātu, the Devas, Nāgas and Asuras were able to enter into it and come out. In this belly there is a palace and a platform. The deities set a bed there, hung banners, spread it with flowers and burned incense; all this was the result of the meritorious actions (puṇyakarman) of the Bodhisattva. Next the Bodhisattva comes down and takes his place there and, by the power of his concentration, enters into the womb while staying as previously in the heaven of the Tuṣita gods”.

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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Punyakarman in Jainism glossary
Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Puṇyakarman (पुण्यकर्मन्) refers to “virtuous actions”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Having become indifferent [to worldly life], certainly the benefit of this life is obtained by those whose actions are virtuous (puṇyakarman) by whom the body is rendered useless for the sake of [their] self. Having taken hold of this body in this life, suffering is endured by you. Hence, that [body] is certainly a completely worthless abode”.

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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Punyakarman in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Puṇyakarman (पुण्यकर्मन्).—a. doing meritorious acts, upright, righteous, (-n.) a meritorious act.

Puṇyakarman is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms puṇya and karman (कर्मन्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Puṇyakarman (पुण्यकर्मन्).—adj. having done meritorious actions, [Indralokāgamana] 1, 22.

Puṇyakarman is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms puṇya and karman (कर्मन्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Puṇyakarman (पुण्यकर्मन्).—[adjective] right-doing, virtuous, honest.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Puṇyakarman (पुण्यकर्मन्):—[=puṇya-karman] [from puṇya] ([ib.; Rāmāyaṇa etc.]) mfn. acting right, virtuous, pious.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Puṇyakarman (पुण्यकर्मन्):—[puṇya-karman] (rmmā-rmmā-rmma) a. Virtuous.

[Sanskrit to German]

Punyakarman in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Punyakarman in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Puṇyakarma (ಪುಣ್ಯಕರ್ಮ):—[noun] a righteous, virtuous act.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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