Prabhankara, Prabhaṅkara, Prabhaṅkarā: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Prabhankara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Prabhankara in Mahayana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Lokottaravāda

Prabhaṅkara (प्रभङ्कर) or Prabhaṃkara is the name of a Buddha under whom Śākyamuni (or Gautama, ‘the historical Buddha’) acquired merit along the first through nine bhūmis, according to the Mahāvastu. There are in total ten bhūmis representing the ten stages of the Bodhisattva’s path towards enlightenment. His name can also be spelled as Prabhaṃkara (प्रभंकर).

Prabhaṅkara is but one among the 500 Buddhas enumerated in the Mahāvastu during a conversation between Mahākātyāyana and Mahākāśyapa, both principle disciples of Gautama Buddha. The Mahāvastu is an important text of the Lokottaravāda school of buddhism, dating from the 2nd century BCE.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Prabhankara in Jainism glossary
Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

1) Prabhaṅkarā (प्रभङ्करा) is the name of an ancient city, according to chapter 4.1 [śreyāṃsanātha-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly, as minister Sumati said to king Jvalanajaṭin “[... ] on this mountain there is a city Prabhaṅkarā, the sole abode of many wonders, which has reached the first place in the necklace of the north row. Its king is named Meghavana, possessing the power of Maghavan, fruitful like a cloud at dawn. He has a wife, Meghamālinī, like a wreath of jasmine with the fragrance of good conduct. They have a son, Vidyutprabha, by whom all kings are surpassed, with unrivaled beauty like Kandarpa. [...]”

2) Prabhaṅkarā (प्रभङ्करा) is the wife of Datta (son of Śrīdattā and Dharmamitra from Vindhyapura), according to chapter 5.3 [śāntinātha-caritra].—Accordingly, as king Vajrāyudha said to the Vidyādhara Pavanavega:—“[...] Vindhyadatta was king in the city Vindhyapura in Airāvata in this same Jambūdvīpa. He had a son, Nalinaketu, with all the male auspicious marks, by his wife, Sulakṣaṇā. In that same city there was the crest-jewel of traders, Dharmamitra, like the sun to the lotuses of friends. His wife, Śrīdattā, bore a son, Datta; and Datta had a wife, Prabhaṅkarā, of divine form. [...]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Prabhankara in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Prabhaṅkara (प्रभङ्कर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Pabhaṃkaraṃ, Pabhaṃkara, Pabhaṃkarā.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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