Odiyana, Oḍiyāna: 4 definitions

Introduction:

Odiyana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Oḍiyāṇa (ओडियाण) is another name for Oḍḍiyāna, which refers to a Mahāpīṭha (main sacred seat) and one of the ten places visited by the Goddess on her pilgrimage, according to Tantric texts such as the Kubjikāmata-tantra, the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “[...] Then content and profound, Kujeśvarī who is endowed with the quality of discernment and whose creation (takes place) by many means said this: “As (I) have flown up (oḍḍitā) (here) within Oḍḍīśa, therefore this (place will be known) as Oḍḍiyānaka”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: archive.org: The Indian Buddhist Iconography

Oḍiyāna (ओडियान) is another name for Uḍḍiyāna, which refers to one of the four pīṭhas (sacred spots) according to the Sādhanamālā.—It is difficult to say from what exact locality Tantrism took its origin. In the Sādhanamālā are mentioned the four Pīṭhas or sacred spots of the Vajrayānists, namely, Kāmākhyā, Sirihaṭṭa, Pūrṇagiri and Uḍḍiyāna. [...] The Sādhanamālā also connects Uḍḍiyāna with such Tantric authors as Saraha. The Jñānasiddhi of Indrabhūti is stated in the last colophon as having started from Uḍḍiyāna (Oḍiyāna).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Oḍiyāna (ओडियान).—see Oḍḍi°.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Oḍiyāṇa (ಒಡಿಯಾಣ):—[noun] an encircling band of metal, esp. of gold or silver, for a woman’s waist; a girdle.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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