Jirnoddhara, aka: Jirna-uddhara, Jīrṇoddhāra; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jirnoddhara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Jirnoddhara in Purana glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jīrṇoddhāra (जीर्णोद्धार).—Erection and consecration of images fixed in temples which have fallen into dilapidation, is called Jīrṇoddhāra. Mention is made in Agni Purāṇa, Chapter 67, about the principles of Jīrṇoddhāra, as follows:

The priest should adorn the image with ornaments and perform 'Stavana'. If the idol is very badly ruined by age it must be abandoned. Broken image and that with any part of the body severed or disfigured should also be abandoned, even if it is made of stone or any other material. When the image is renovated the priest should make burnt offerings thousand times with Narasiṃhamantra (spell or incantation). If the ruined image is made of wood it should be burned. If it is made of stone it should be placed at the bottom of deep water, either in the sea or anywhere else. If it is made of metals or jewels, it must be put into water. The ruined image should be placed in a carriage and covered with a cloth. With instrumental music and so forth the image should be taken to water in a procession and then submerged in water. After this the priest must be given a gift. Only after this should the new image be erected and consecrated. On a good day in an auspicious moment a new image of the same material and measurement as of the old image should be erected and consecrated by the priest.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Jirnoddhara in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jīrṇoddhāra (जीर्णोद्धार) refers to the “renovation of the temple” as described in the Śaivāgamas.—The Anukarmavidhi of Kamikāgama explains it thus: If the temple is decayed but still has regular pūjā, it can be said to be in a good state. But if there are no pūjās, then it is said to have fallen into a bad state. If jīrṇoddhāra or renovation is performed, it bestows highest results on the kartā. This is because, both the performing of worship and not performing of worship at a decayed temple result in ill-effects. Therefore, for general welfare, renovation should be performed according to the śāstra. The Anukarmavidhi also has elaborate rules and instructions for the proper renovation of temples.

Source: Shodhganga: Temple management in the Āgamas
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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India history and geogprahy

Jirnoddhara in India history glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jīrṇ-oddhāra.—(EI 23, 26; HA), repairs or renovation and conservation. Note: jīrṇ-oddhāra is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Jirnoddhara in Marathi glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

jīrṇōddhāra (जीर्णोद्धार).—m (S) Removing of an old idol or temple and substituting of a new one. 2 fig. Exchanging of an old thing for a new one gen: also restoration or renewal of the old.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jīrṇōddhāra (जीर्णोद्धार).—m Removing of an old idol or temple and substituting of a new one. Exchanging of an old thing for a new one, also restoration or renewal of the old.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jirnoddhara in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jīrṇoddhāra (जीर्णोद्धार).—'renewing the old', repairs, especially of a temple or any charitable or religious institution.

Derivable forms: jīrṇoddhāraḥ (जीर्णोद्धारः).

Jīrṇoddhāra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jīrṇa and uddhāra (उद्धार).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jīrṇoddhāra (जीर्णोद्धार).—m.

(-raḥ) Repairing, renewal, repairs. E. jīrṇa and uddhāra lifting up.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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