Dvaita: 5 definitions

Introduction

Dvaita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Dvaita (द्वैत) (also known as Bheda-vāda, Tattva-vāda and Bimba-pratibimba-vāda) is a school of Vedanta founded by Shri Madhvacharya (c. 1238-1317 CE) who was also known as Purna Prajna and Ananda Tirtha. Dvaita stresses a strict distinction between God— the Supreme-Soul (paramātmā (परमात्मा)) and the individual souls (jiivatma (जीवात्मा)). According to Madhvacharya, the individual souls of beings are not 'created' by God but do, nonetheless, depend on Him for their existence.

Dvaita Vedanta (dualistic conclusions of the Vedas) espouses dualism by theorizing the existence of two separate realities. The first and the more important reality is that of Vishnu or Brahman. Vishnu is the supreme Self, God, the absolute truth of the universe, the independent reality. The second reality is that of dependent but equally real universe that exists with its own separate essence. Everything that is composed of the second reality, such as individual soul (Jiva), matter, etc. exist with their own separate reality. The distinguishing factor of this philosophy as opposed to Advaita Vedanta (monistic conclusion of Vedas) is that God takes on a personal role and is seen as a real eternal entity that governs and controls the universe.

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

dvaita (द्वैत).—n (S) Diversity (of opinions, sentiments, interests). 2 Dislike, disagreement, difference. 3 The doctrine of the duality or distinct subsistence of the Deity and the universe.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

dvaita (द्वैत).—n Diversity (of opinions &c.) Dis- like, disagreement. The doctrine of dualism.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Dvaita (द्वैत).—[dvidhā itaṃ dvitaṃ tasya bhāvaḥ svārthe aṇ]

1) Duality.

2) Dualism in philosophy, the assertion of two distinct principles, such as the maintenance of the doctrine that, spirit and matter, Brahman and the Universe, or the Individual and the Supreme Soul, are different from each other; cf. अद्वैत (advaita); किं शास्त्रं श्रवणेन यस्य गलति द्वैतान्ध- कारोत्करः (kiṃ śāstraṃ śravaṇena yasya galati dvaitāndha- kārotkaraḥ) Bv.1.86.

3) Name of a forest.

Derivable forms: dvaitam (द्वैतम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dvaita (द्वैत).—n.

(-taṃ) 1. Duplication, doubling or being doubled. 2. Duality, in philosophy, the assertion of two principles, as the distinctness of life and soul, spirit and matter, god and the universe. E. dvi two tal affix, dvita double, two-fold, abstract affix aṇ. dvidhā itaṃ dvītaṃ tasya bhāvaḥ svārthe vā aṇ .

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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