Bhushananga, aka: Bhūṣaṇāṅga, Bhushana-anga; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Bhushananga means something in Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Bhūṣaṇāṅga can be transliterated into English as Bhusananga or Bhushananga, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Bhushananga in Jainism glossary... « previous · [B] · next »

Bhūṣaṇāṅga (भूषणाङ्ग) refers to one of ten types of “wishing trees” (kalpavṛkṣa) that are used by the inhabitants of Bhogabhūmis (paradise) for obtaining their food, clothing, etc. The word Bhogabhūmi applies to various regions situated within Jambūdvīpa: the first continent of the Madhya-loka (middle-word), according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 3.10.

Jambūdvīpa (where the Bhūṣaṇāṅga-kalpavṛkṣa occurs) is in the centre of all continents and oceans; all continents and oceans are concentric circles with Jambūdvīpa in the centre. Like the navel is in the centre of the body, Jambūdvīpa is in the centre of all continents and oceans. Sumeru Mount is in the centre of Jambūdvīpa. It is also called Mount Sudarśana.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 3: The Lower and middle worlds
General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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