Abhiya, Abhiyā, Ābhīya: 6 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Abhiya means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: archive.org: The Mahavastu

Abhiya (अभिय) is the name of a monk who falsely accused Nanda of immorality in the city of Vasumata according to the Mahavāstu vol 1 chapter 3 (the story of Abhiya).

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Abhiyā (अभिया).—2 P.

1) To go up to, approach, go or repair to; अभिययौ स हिमाचलमुच्छ्रितम् (abhiyayau sa himācalamucchritam) Ki.5.1; R.9.27.

2) To come or draw near (without an object); come (as time).

3) To march against, attack, assail, encounter; अभि स्पृधो यासिषद् वज्रबाहुः (abhi spṛdho yāsiṣad vajrabāhuḥ) Rv.1.175.5; कुबेरादभियास्यमानात् (kuberādabhiyāsyamānāt) R.5.3; Dk.3.

4) To give or resign oneself to, devote, attach or betake oneself to.

5) To partake or share in, get, obtain. -Caus. To send away.

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Abhiyā (अभिया).—m., f. Going to, approaching, assailing.

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Ābhīya (आभीय).—a. Contained in rules or Sūtras of Pāṇinī from VI.4.22 to VI.4.129.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Abhiya (अभिय).—name of a monk of old (previous incarnation of Śākyamuni): Mahāvastu i.35.13 ff. (A translation(s) of his story, Mahāvastu i.34—45, by R. Otto Franke, in Königsberger Beiträge, 1929, pp. 115—124).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Abhiyā (अभिया).—approach, go to or against; take to, partake of ([accusative]).

Abhiyā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms abhi and (या).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Abhiyā (अभिया):—[=abhi-yā] 1. abhi-√yā to go up to in a hostile manner, attack, assail, [Ṛg-veda i, 174, 5] ([Aorist] [subjunctive] -yāsiṣat), [Atharva-veda] etc.;

—to go up to, approach, obtain, [Mahābhārata] etc.;

—to devote one’s self to take up (as pāṣaṇḍam, ‘heterodoxies’), [Bhāgavata-purāṇa] :—[Causal] to cause to approach, send towards, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] 2. abhi-yā mfn. going up to, approaching, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] assailing, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] (said of a prince) ‘going all round’ id est. vigilant, careful, [Mahābhārata]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Abhiyā (अभिया):—[tatpurusha compound] m. f.

(-yāḥ-yāḥ) Coming near, approaching, esp. with a hostile intention; attacking, assailing; e. g. in the following mahāyamaka of the Bhaṭṭik.: abhiyātā varaṃ tuṅgaṃ bhūbhṛtaṃ ruciraṃ puraḥ . karkaśaṃ prathitaṃ dhāma sasattvaṃ puṣkarekṣaṇam .. abhiyātāvaraṃ (or abhiyātā varaṃ) tuṅgaṃ bhūbhṛtaṃ ruciraṃ puraḥ . karkaśaṃ prathitaṃ dhāma sasattvaṃ puṣkare kṣaṇam; where abhiyātāvaram in the second Śloka is analyzed by the commentators either abhiyā (instrum. sing. of abhiyā or of abhī ‘fearless’, scil. hanūmatā) and atāvaram (ata ‘wind, sun &c.’ and āvaram) or abhiyātā (instrum. sing. of abhiyāt) and varam. E. with abhi, kṛt aff. kvip.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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