Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 60

Bu-Pc.60.1.1 BD.2.414 … at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the group of seventeen monks did not store their requisites. The group of six monks hid a bowl and a robe belonging to the group of seventeen monks. The group of seventeen monks spoke thus to the group of six monks:

“Your reverences, give back Vin.4.123 the bowl and the robe to us.”

The group of six monks laughed; these cried out. Monks spoke thus:

“Why do you, your reverences, cry out?”

“Your reverences, this group of six monks are hiding a bowl and a robe belonging to us.”

Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can the group of six monks hide a bowl and a robe belonging to monks?” …

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monks, are hiding a bowl and a robe belonging to monks?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How can you, foolish men, hide a bowl and a robe belonging to monks? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

Whatever monk should hide or should cause to hide a monk’s bowl or robe or (piece of cloth) to sit upon[1] or needle-case or girdle, even in fun, there is an offence of expiation.”


Bu-Pc.60.2.1 Whatever means: … is monk to be understood in this case.

BD.2.415 A monk’s means: another monk’s.

Bowl means: there are two (kinds of) bowls, an iron bowl and a clay bowl.[2]

Robe means: any one robe of the six (kinds of) robes, (including) the least one fit for assignment.[3]

(Piece of cloth) to sit upon means: it is so called if it has a border.[4]

Needle-case[5] means: it is with a needle or it is without a needle.

Girdle means: there are two (kinds of) girdles, those made of strips of cloth[6] and those …[7]

Should hide means: if he himself hides, there is an offence of expiation.

Or should came to hide means: if he commands another, there is an offence of expiation. When once commanded, if he hides much, there is an offence of expiation.

Even in fun means: desiring amusement.


Bu-Pc.60.2.2 If he thinks that he is ordained when he is ordained, (and) hides or causes (someone) to hide a bowl … or a girdle, even in fun, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether he is ordained … If he thinks that he is not ordained when he is ordained … offence of expiation. If he hides or causes (someone) to hide another requisite, even in fun, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he hides or causes (someone) to hide the bowl or robe or another requisite of one who is not ordained, even in fun, there is an offence of wrong-doing.[8] If he thinks that he is ordained when BD.2.416 he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that he is not ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing.[9]


Bu-Pc.60.2.3 There is no offence if he is not desiring fun; if he puts in order what is badly arranged[10]; if he puts it in order, thinking, ‘I will give it back, having given dhamma-talk’; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Tenth

This is its key:

Fermented liquor, the finger, and water,[11]
and disrespect, frightening,
Fire, bathing, disfigurement,
himself (the robe) not having been taken away,
and about hiding.

The Sixth Division: that on drinking fermented liquor

Footnotes and references:

1.

nisīdana. Cf. Vin.1.295 and above, BD.2.34, BD.2.87, BD.2.414

2.

= above, BD.2.115 (where see n.2), and Vin.4.243. Cf. also the three bowls mentioned at Vin.3.169 = BD.1.292, lohapatta, sāṭakapatta, sumbhakapatta.

3.

Cf. above, BD.2.40, BD.2.48.

4.

sadasa. Cf. above, BD.2.87, and Vin.4.171.

6.

paṭṭika. I follow translation at Vinaya Texts iii.143.

7.

sūkarantaka. Vinaya Texts iii.143, n.5, “we do not venture to translate the term.” See Buddhaghosa’s explanation at Vin.2.319. Both these kinds of girdles are allowed at Vin.2.136.

8.

Indicating that members of other sects were not to be inconvenienced.

9.

Another of these errors, noted before—should surely read anāpatti, no offence.

10.

dunnikkhitta, wrongly put down or set down.

11.

toya.

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