Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 86

Bu-Pc.86.1.1 BD.3.87 … among the Sakyans at Kapilavatthu in the Banyan monastery. Now at that time monks were invited by a certain ivory-worker, saying: “If the masters want a needle case,[1] I (can supply them) with a needle-case.”[2] Then the monks asked for many needle-cases; they asked for large needle-cases for those who had small needle-cases, they asked for small needle-cases for those who had large needle-cases. Then that ivory-worker, making many needle-cases for the monks, was not able to make other goods for sale, and he did not keep himself going and his wife and children suffered. People … spread it about, saying: “How can these recluses, sons of the Sakyans, not knowing moderation,[3] ask for many needle-cases? This (man), making many needle-cases for these (monks), is not able to make other goods for sale … and his wife and children suffer.” Monks heard these people who … spread it about. Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying: “How can these monks, not knowing moderation, ask for many needle-cases? …

“Is it true, as is said, monks, that monks, not knowing moderation, asked for many needle-cases?” “It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How can you, monks, not knowing moderation, ask for many needle-cases? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

BD.3.88Whatever monk should have a needle-case made that is made of bone or made of ivory or made of horn, there is an offence of expiation involving breaking up.[4]


Bu-Pc.86.2.1 Whatever means: … monk is to be understood in this case.

Bone means: whatever is bone.

Ivory means: it is called elephant-ivory.[5]

Horn means: whatever is horn.

Should have made means: if he makes it or causes it to be made, in the action there is an offence of wrong-doing: having broken it up on acquisition, an offence of expiation is to be confessed.

If what was incompletely executed by himself he has finished by himself, there is an offence of expiation. If he makes others finish what was incompletely executed by himself, there is an offence of expiation. If what was incompletely executed by others he has finished by himself, there is an offence of expiation Vin.4.168 . If he makes others finish what was incompletely executed by others, there is an offence of expiation. If he makes it or causes it to be made for another, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If, having acquired what was made for another, he makes use of it, there is an offence of wrong-doing.[6]


Bu-Pc.86.2.2 There is no offence if it is a block,[7] fire-wood,[8] a BD.3.89 buckle,[9] a box for ointment,[10] a stick to put the ointment on with,[11] the handle of an adze,[12] a towel[13]; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Fourth

Footnotes and references:

1.

sūcighara. Cf. Vin.4.123, where this is one of the articles that monks are forbidden to hide, even in fun.

2.

For the rest of this paragraph, cf. Bu-NP.22, and where a potter, also of Kapilavatthu, used this expression in inviting monks to let him supply them with bowls.

3.

Omitted above, probably owing to some scribe’s error.

4.

bhedanakaṃ pācittiyaṃ. Cf. nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ. The remainder of the Pācittiyas involve some other form of punishment, chedanaka and uddālanaka, in addition to confession or expiation, pācittiya.

5.

hatthidanta, or elephant’s tuBu-Sk.

6.

Cf. Vin.3.225.

7.

gaṇthikā. Allowed at Vin.2.136 to prevent a robe from being blown up by the wind. Word occurs again at Vin.1.46, Vin.2.215; Ja.1.150.

8.

araṇika. Vin-a.883, araṇike ti araṇidhanuke. Critical Pali Dictionary calls araṇika “a part of the fire-tool,” and refers to araṇī, “either of the two pieces of wood for making a fire.” Araṇidhanuka it calls a “bow for keeping the twirling-stick going.”

9.

vidha. Vin-a.883 reads vīṭhe. Pali-English Dictionary suggests “a little box” tentatively. Commentary does not help. Allowed at Vin.2.136; translated at Vinaya Texts iii.143 “buckle.” with note that “the word occurs also, and apparently in the same sense, in the Old Commentary on the 86th Pācittiya.”

10.

añjanī. Allowed at Vin.1.203, but to be made of prescribed materials, and again at Vin.2.135. Word occurs at MN.ii.65; Thag.773. MN-a.3.303 reads anjañī ti añjananālikā, a tube (or box) for ointment; cf. Thig-a.267.

11.

añjanisalāka. Allowed at Vin.1.203, to be made of prescribed materials, and again at Vin.2.135.

12.

vāsijaṭa. Also at AN.iv.127; SN.iii.154.

13.

udakapuñchanī. Allowed at Vin.2.122.

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