Svadeha, Sva-deha: 4 definitions

Introduction:

Svadeha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Svadeha (स्वदेह) refers to “one’s own body”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.39.—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] bereft of their virility, the heaven-dwelling Devas fled. Viṣṇu, alone, the foremost of those who make use of Māyā, remained there but he was afraid. Viṣṇu, the lord, created out of his body (i.e., svadeha) millions of divine beings like himself”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Svadeha (स्वदेह) (Cf. Svatanu) refers to “one’s own body”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “What is the other group of four? One should know that it is the progressive arising, externally and internally, of the sacred seats. In the (regular forward) order the sequence is O (Oḍḍiyāna) JĀ (Jālandhara) PŪ (Pūrṇagiri) KĀ (Kāmarūpa), and KĀ PŪ JĀ O in the reverse order. They are located (between the) eyebrows, in the cavity (of the mouth), in the throat and in heart, respectively. Pervading one’s own body, they are located in the Liṅga, Foundation, the Self-supported and the navel. They should be known to be within one’s own (subtle) body [i.e., svadeha-stha] in the reverse order”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Svadeha (स्वदेह) refers to “one’s own body”, according to the 13th-century Matsyendrasaṃhitā: a Kubjikā-Tripurā oriented Tantric Yoga text of the Ṣaḍanvayaśāmbhava tradition from South India.—Accordingly, “[The intercourse (saṃga)]:—[...] The Yogin who has had sex with Māyā should rub his semen mixed with gold, camphor and saffron on his own body (svadeha): [his] beauty will become moon-like. [...]

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Svadeha (स्वदेह) refers to “one’s own body”, according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter 39).—Accordingly, “[The knowledge of the retribution of actions (karmavipāka-jñānabala)].—[...] [How can the mind at death, which lasts only a short time, prevail over the power of actions that extend over an entire lifetime?]—Although this mind may be very short, its power is intense. It is like fire or poison that, although small, can accomplish great things. The mind at death is so determinate and so strong that it prevails over the power of action extending over a century. This last mind is called ‘the great mind’ (mahācitta) for it has, as its urgent task, the abandoning of the body (svadeha-parityāga) and the organs Thus the man in battle (raṇa), who does not spare his life, is called a hero (śūra), and the Arhat, who gives up attachment to life, attains Arhat-hood [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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