Sruk: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Sruk means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstra

Sruk (स्रुक्, “oblation spoon”):—In Hindu iconology (śilpaśāstra), this symbol represents converting all action into service of the divine. It is also one of six items that Agni is displayed carrying. Agni, one of the most important Vedic gods, represents divine illumination

Source: Google Books: The Theory of Citrasutras in Indian Painting

Sruk (स्रुक्, ‘sacrificial ladle’) is a weapon (āyudha or bādhra) according to the Vāstusūtra Upaniṣad.

Source: Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography

Sruk (स्रुक्) and Sruva (स्रुव) are two different kinds of spoons, used to take out ghee from the ghee-pot and pour it out to the sacred fire in the sacrifices. The former of these has a hemispherical bowl, while the other is haped very much like a modern spoon. A sruk of large proportion is generally carried by the goddess Annapūrṇā.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)

Sruk (स्रुक्) refers to one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “accessories” of a detiy commonly seen depicted in Hindu iconography, defined according to texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—The śilpa texts have classified the various accessories under the broad heading of āyudha or karuvi (implement), including even flowers, animals, and musical instruments. Certain utensils and other objects that are commonly found in the hands of the images are, for example Sruk.

Sruk and sruva are two different kinds of spoons, used to take out ghee from the ghee-pot and pour it out over the sacred fire in the sacrifices. The former of these has a hemispherical bowl, while the latter is shaped very much like a modern spoon. A sruk of large proportion is generally carried by the Goddess Annapūrṇa.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Sruk (स्रुक्).—A sacrificial utensil.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 65. 32.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: archive.org: Catalogue of Pancaratra Agama Texts

Sruk (स्रुक्) refers to a “spoon” (representing one of the symbols given to initiates after the abhiṣeka-rite), as discussed in the tenth chapter of the Nāradīyasaṃhitā: a Pāñcarātra document comprising over 3000 verses in 30 chapters presenting in a narrative framework the teachings of Nārada to Gautama, dealing primarily with modes of worship and festivals.—Description of the chapter [abhiṣeka-vidhāna]: Gautama wants to hear details concerning the qualifying abhiṣeka-bath that admits an initiate to deśika-status. [...] One type of abhiṣeka-rite requires only one pot (kalaśa) to be used, at the conclusion of which bathing ceremony the candidate is given the symbols of his new office—[e.g., a sruk or spoon]—along with a charge from his preceptor to pursue his duties (21-32). The initiate, in turn, honors this preceptor in all appropriate ways (33-37).

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sruk (स्रुक्):—[from sruc] in [compound] for sruc.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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