Sruva, Shruva, Śruva, Śruvā, Sruvā: 19 definitions

Introduction:

Sruva means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Śruva and Śruvā can be transliterated into English as Sruva or Shruva, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Images (photo gallery)

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography

Sruk (स्रुक्) and Sruva (स्रुव) are two different kinds of spoons, used to take out ghee from the ghee-pot and pour it out to the sacred fire in the sacrifices. The former of these has a hemispherical bowl, while the other is haped very much like a modern spoon.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)

Sruva (स्रुव) refers to one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “accessories” of a detiy commonly seen depicted in Hindu iconography, defined according to texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—The śilpa texts have classified the various accessories under the broad heading of āyudha or karuvi (implement), including even flowers, animals, and musical instruments. Certain utensils and other objects that are commonly found in the hands of the images are, for example Sruva.

Sruk and sruva are two different kinds of spoons, used to take out ghee from the ghee-pot and pour it out over the sacred fire in the sacrifices. The former of these has a hemispherical bowl, while the latter is shaped very much like a modern spoon. A sruk of large proportion is generally carried by the Goddess Annapūrṇa.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Sruva (स्रुव).—A sacrificial utensil.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 65. 32.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Sacred Texts: The Grihya Sutras, Part 2 (SBE30)

Sruva (स्रुव) refers to a “ladle”, according to the Āpastamba-yajña-paribhāṣā-sūtras.—“If the juhū has been elsewhere employed, let it be done with a ladle (sruva). The offering is made in the Āhavanīya fire”. Commentary: The juhū is a sruc, a spoon, the sruva, a ladle.

Dharmashastra book cover
context information

Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Sruva (स्रुव) refers to “sacrificial ladles”, according to the Mattavilāsaprahasana.—Accordingly, as the Kāpālika cries out: “My darling, look. This pub resembles the Vedic sacrificial ground. For its signpost resembles the sacrificial pillar; in this case alcohol is the Soma, drunkards are the sacrificial priests, the wine glasses are the special cups for drinking Soma, the roasted meat and other appetizers are the fire oblations, the drunken babblings are the sacrificial formulae, the songs are the Sāman-hymns, the pitchers (udaṅka) are the sacrificial ladles (sruva), thirst is the fire and the owner of the pub is the patron of the sacrifice”

Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): (Shaivism)

Sruva (स्रुव) refers to the “sacrificial ladle”, according to the Saurasaṃhitā (verse 6.7c-d).—Accordingly, “For the purpose of [performing the] fire rite, one should make the sacrificial ladle (sruva) a straight arm's length”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: archive.org: Catalogue of Pancaratra Agama Texts

Sruva (स्रुव) refers to a “ladle” (representing one of the symbols given to initiates after the abhiṣeka-rite), as discussed in the tenth chapter of the Nāradīyasaṃhitā: a Pāñcarātra document comprising over 3000 verses in 30 chapters presenting in a narrative framework the teachings of Nārada to Gautama, dealing primarily with modes of worship and festivals.—Description of the chapter [abhiṣeka-vidhāna]: Gautama wants to hear details concerning the qualifying abhiṣeka-bath that admits an initiate to deśika-status. [...] One type of abhiṣeka-rite requires only one pot (kalaśa) to be used, at the conclusion of which bathing ceremony the candidate is given the symbols of his new office—[e.g., a sruva or ladle]—along with a charge from his preceptor to pursue his duties (21-32). The initiate, in turn, honors this preceptor in all appropriate ways (33-37).

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Sruva (स्रुव) as opposed to Sruc, denotes in the ritual literature a ‘small ladle’ used to convey the offering (Ājya) from the cooking-pot (sthālī) to the ‘large ladle’ (juhū). In the Rigveda, however, it was clearly used for the actual Soma libation.

Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Sruva [स्रुवा] in the Sanskrit language is the name of a plant identified with Boswellia serrata Roxb. ex Colebr. from the Burseraceae (Torchwood) family having the following synonyms: Boswellia glabra, Boswellia thurifera, Bursera thurifera. For the possible medicinal usage of sruva, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Sruva in India is the name of a plant defined with Clematis gouriana in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Clematis martini H. Lév. (among others).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Bulletin de l’Académie Internationale de Géographie, Botanique (1907)
· Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2007)
· Bulletin de l’Académie Internationale de Géographie, Botanique (1902)
· Bulletin de la Société Botanique de France (1903)
· Botaniska Notiser (1979)
· Verhandlungen des Botanischen Vereins für die Provinz Brandenburg und die Angrenzenden Länder (1885)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Sruva, for example chemical composition, extract dosage, side effects, pregnancy safety, health benefits, diet and recipes, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
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This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śruva (श्रुव).—

1) A sacrifice.

2) A sacrificial ladle.

Derivable forms: śruvaḥ (श्रुवः).

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Śruvā (श्रुवा).—A sacrificial ladle; cf. स्रुवा (sruvā).

--- OR ---

Sruva (स्रुव) or Sruvā (स्रुवा).—

1) A sacrificial ladle; चरूणां स्रुक्स्रुवाणां च शुद्धिरुष्णेन वारिणा (carūṇāṃ sruksruvāṇāṃ ca śuddhiruṣṇena vāriṇā) Manusmṛti 5.117.

2) A Soma ladle.

3) A spring, cascade.

Derivable forms: sruvaḥ (स्रुवः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śruva (श्रुव).—m.

(-vaḥ) Sacrifice, oblation. nf.

(-vaṃ-vā) A sort of ladle used for pouring Ghee or oiled butter at a sacrifice. E. śru to ooze or leak, aff. ka .

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Sruva (स्रुव).—mf.

(-vaḥ-vā) A ladle with a double extremity, or two oval collateral excavations made of Khadira-wood, and used to pour Ghee upon the sacrificial fire. f.

(-vā) 1. A shrub, (Sanseviera zeylanica.) 3. A tree, (Boswellia thurifera.) E. snu to drop or ooze, (from or by it,) aff. ka .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śruva (श्रुव).—incorrectly for sruva, m. 1. A sacrificial ladle to pour ghṛta on the fire of a sacrifice, [Rāmāyaṇa] 6, 96, 12. 2. Sacrifice, [Rāmāyaṇa] 2, 62, 26.

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Sruva (स्रुव).—i. e. sru + a (cf. śruva), I. m., and f. , A sacrificial ladle to pour ghṛta on a sacrificial fire, Journ. of the German Oriental Society, ix. viii. Ii. f. , The name of two plants.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sruva (स्रुव).—[masculine] a small sacrificial ladle.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śruva (श्रुव):—etc. See sruva.

2) Sruva (स्रुव):—[from sru] m. (cf. sruc) a small wooden ladle (with a double extremity, or two oval collateral excavations, used for pouring clarified melted butter into the large ladle or Sruk [see sruc]; sometimes also employed instead of the latter in libations), [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

3) [v.s. ...] a sacrifice, oblation, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Sruvā (स्रुवा):—[from sruva > sru] a f. See below.

5) [from sru] b f. the ladle called Sruva, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] Sanseviera Roxburghiana, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] Boswellia Thurifera, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śruva (श्रुव):—(vaḥ) 1. m. Sacrifice. n. Sacrificial ladle.

2) Sruva (स्रुव):—[(vaḥ-vā)] 1. m. f. A wooden ladle. f. Name of a shrub or tree.

[Sanskrit to German]

Sruva in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Sruva (ಸ್ರುವ):—

1) [noun] a large ladle made of palāśa (Butea frondosa) or khadira (Acacia catechu) tree, used for pouring clarified butter on a sacrificial fire or serving sōma rasa( the juice of the plant Sarcostemma acidum).

2) [noun] a waterfall.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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