Sruva, aka: Shruva, Śruva, Śruvā, Sruvā; 4 Definition(s)

Introduction

Sruva means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Śruva and Śruvā can be transliterated into English as Sruva or Shruva, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Sruk (स्रुक्) and Sruva (स्रुव) are two different kinds of spoons, used to take out ghee from the ghee-pot and pour it out to the sacred fire in the sacrifices. The former of these has a hemispherical bowl, while the other is haped very much like a modern spoon.

(Source): Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography

Sruva (स्रुव) is the name of a certain utensil commonly seen as being held in the hands of the deities in sculptures of Hindu gods and goddesses.—Sruva and Sruk are two different kinds of spoons, used to take out ghee from the ghee-pot and pour it out over the sacred fire in the sacrifices. The former of these has a hemispherical bowl, while the latter is shaped very much like a modern spoon. A sruk of large proportion is generally carried by the Goddess Annapūrṇa.

(Source): Shodhganga: The significance of the Mula beras in the Hindu temples of Tamilnadu
Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

Purana

Sruva (स्रुव).—A sacrificial utensil.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 65. 32.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

General definition (in Hinduism)

Sruva (स्रुव) as opposed to Sruc, denotes in the ritual literature a ‘small ladle’ used to convey the offering (Ājya) from the cooking-pot (sthālī) to the ‘large ladle’ (juhū). In the Rigveda, however, it was clearly used for the actual Soma libation.

(Source): archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Relevant definitions

Search found 12 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Shruvavriksha
Śruvāvṛkṣa (श्रुवावृक्ष).—the Vikaṅkata tree.Derivable forms: śruvāvṛkṣaḥ (श्रुवावृक्षः).Śruvāv...
Sruvapragrahana
Sruvapragrahaṇa (स्रुवप्रग्रहण) or Sruvāpragrahaṇa (स्रुवाप्रग्रहण).—a. taking all to one's sel...
Sruvahasta
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Sruvakarna
Sruvakarṇa (स्रुवकर्ण) or Sruvākarṇa (स्रुवाकर्ण).—a. having ladle-mark on the ear. Sruvakarṇa ...
Brahmi
Brahmī (ब्रह्मी).—1) Name of a medicinal plant.2) A kind of fish.--- OR --- Brāhmī (ब्राह्मी).—...
Sruk
Sruk (स्रुक्) is the name of a certain utensil commonly seen as being held in the hands of the ...
Hayagriva
Hayagrīva (हयग्रीव) refers to one of the various Vibhava manifestations according to the Īśvara...
Yajnadravya
Yajñadravya (यज्ञद्रव्य).—anything (e. g. a vessel) used for a sacrifice. Derivable forms: yajñ...
Yajnavaraha
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Agni-karya
Agni karya forms the core of a sacrifice. It includes purification rites and the homas. The ...
Valli-kalyana-sundara
Vallikalyāṇasundara (one of the aspects of Subrahmaṇya, according to the Kumāra-tantra): In ...
Agnijata
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