Pratapa, Pratāpa: 12 definitions

Introduction

Pratapa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Pratāpa (प्रताप) refers to “great valour”, which is mentioned as obtainable through the worship of Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.14:—“[...] worldly pleasures and salvation (bhuktimukti) will be secured by a person who worships with Tulasī. Great valour (pratāpa) can be secured by worshipping with Arka or Kubjakalhāra flowers.”.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Pratāpa (प्रताप).—A prince of the country of Sauvīra. He stood behind the chariot of Jayadratha holding his flag. Arjunaslew him. (Śloka 10, Chapter 265, Vana Parva).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Pratāpa (प्रताप).—A follower of Bali.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 245. 32.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Pratāpa.—see partāb. Note: pratāpa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Pratāpa.—same as partāb. Note: pratāpa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

pratāpa (प्रताप).—m (S) Majesty, dignity, authoritativeness: also glory, grandeur, mightiness. 2 Power, prowess, puissance, valor. 3 Efficacy, virtue, potency (as of medicines). 4 A gold coin, valuing about two rupees, current at Dharwaṛ &c.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

pratāpa (प्रताप).—m Majesty, dignity. Power, pro- wess. Virtue.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pratapa (प्रतप).—The heat of the sun.

Derivable forms: pratapaḥ (प्रतपः).

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Pratāpa (प्रताप).—

1) Heat, warmth; अन्यप्रतापमासाद्य यो दृढत्वं न गच्छति (anyapratāpamāsādya yo dṛḍhatvaṃ na gacchati) (here pratāpa means 'prowess' also); Pt.1.17.

2) Radiance, glowing heat; अमी च कथमादित्याः प्रतापक्षति- शीतलाः (amī ca kathamādityāḥ pratāpakṣati- śītalāḥ) Ku.2.24.

3) Splendour, brilliancy.

4) Dignity, majesty, glory; सर्वः प्रायो भजति विकृतिं भिद्यमाने प्रतापे (sarvaḥ prāyo bhajati vikṛtiṃ bhidyamāne pratāpe) Mv.2.4.

5) Courage, valour, heroism, प्रतापस्तस्य भानोश्च युगपद् व्यानशे दिशः (pratāpastasya bhānośca yugapad vyānaśe diśaḥ) R.4.15. (where pratāpa means 'heat' also); 4.3; शत्रुश्रेणीपतङ्गाञ्ज्वलति रघुपते त्वत्प्रतापप्रदीपः (śatruśreṇīpataṅgāñjvalati raghupate tvatpratāpapradīpaḥ) Udb.; यं देशं श्रयते तमेव कुरुते बाहुप्रतापार्जितम् (yaṃ deśaṃ śrayate tameva kurute bāhupratāpārjitam) H.

6) Spirit, vigour, energy.

7) Ardour, zeal.

8) Issue of ultimatum; प्रेषणं सन्धिपालत्वं प्रतापो मित्रसंग्रहः (preṣaṇaṃ sandhipālatvaṃ pratāpo mitrasaṃgrahaḥ) Kau. A.1.16.

Derivable forms: pratāpaḥ (प्रतापः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Pratāpa (प्रताप).—m., (1) name of a large number of former Buddhas: Mahāvastu i.58.9; (2) = next, probably only by corruption: Mahāvastu i.6.13 (no v.l.); some mss. read so in i.15.7 (verse), but unmetrically.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pratāpa (प्रताप).—m.

(-paḥ) 1. Majesty, dignity, glory, possession of rank and power. 2. Spirit, valour, energy. 3. Splendour, brilliancy. 4. Warmth, glowing, Heat. E. pra before, tap to shine, aff. ghañ . “arka vṛkṣe ca .”

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pratāpa (प्रताप).—i. e. pra-tap + a, m. 1. Heat, [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 4, 12. 2. Splendour, Böhtl. Ind. Spr. 131. 3. Majesty, dignity, Kām. Nītis. 8, 12.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pratāpa (प्रताप).—[masculine] heat, glow, splendour, brilliancy, highness, majesty, power.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pratapa (प्रतप):—[=pra-tapa] [from pra-tap] m. the heat of the sun

2) Pratāpa (प्रताप):—[=pra-tāpa] [from pra-tap] m. glowing heat, heat, warmth, [Kāvya literature; Varāha-mihira; Suśruta]

3) [v.s. ...] splendour, brilliancy, glory, majesty, dignity, power, strength, energy, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

4) [v.s. ...] Calotropis Gigantea (= arka), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] Name of a man, [Mahābhārata; Rājataraṅgiṇī]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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