Padakaya, aka: Padakāya, Pada-kaya; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Padakaya means something in Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Padakaya in Buddhism glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Padakāya (पदकाय) refers to “a group of sentences” and represents one of the thirteen “conditions” (saṃskāra) that are “unassociated with mind” (citta-viprayukta) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 30). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (eg., nāmakāya). The work is attributed to Nagarjuna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Padakaya in Marathi glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

paḍakaya (पडकय).—f C The practice among husbandmen of one lending his people or cattle to a neighbor on his occasion of need, receiving on his own occasions the assistance of the people or cattle of the other.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

paḍakaya (पडकय).—f The practice among husband- men of one lending his people or cattle to a neighbour on his occasion of need, receiving on his own occa- sions the assistance of the people or cattle of the other.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of padakaya in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 2077 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Pada
Pāda (पाद, “feet”) refers to one of the seven “major limbs” (aṅga), which represents a division...
Kaya
Kāya.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘six’. Note: kāya is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can ...
Padartha
Padārtha (पदार्थ, “categories”).—According to Kaṇāda, all object of knowledge or all real comes...
Janapada
Janapada (जनपद) is a synonym for Deśa (“region”), according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-v...
Ekapada
Ekapāda (एकपाद) or Ekapādamūrti refers to one of the twenty-eighth forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentio...
Mahakaya
Mahākāyā (महाकाया).—A woman follower of Lord Subrahmaṇya (Mahābhārata Śalya Parva, Chapter 46, ...
Padapa
Pādapa (पादप) refers to a “tree”, as mentioned in a list of twenty-five synonyms in the second ...
Dharmakaya
Dharmakāya (धर्मकाय).—m. (in Pali recorded only as Bhvr. adj. in quite different sense, having ...
Drupada
Drupada (द्रुपद).—(Saumaki,* Yajñasena). Father of Pāñcālī. Genealogy. Descended from Viṣṇu i...
Tripada
Tripada.—(LP), the three chief account books, viz. rojmol, khātā-vahī and pāvtī-vahī. Note: tri...
Kalmashapada
Kalmāṣapāda (कल्माषपाद).—(KALMĀṢĀṄGHRI, MITRASAHA, SAUDĀSA). A famous king of the Ikṣvāku dynas...
Dvipada
Dvipada (द्विपद).—a. having two feet (as a verse). Dvipada is a Sanskrit compound consisting of...
Padadi
Padādi (पदादि).—1) the beginning of the line of a stanza. 2) the beginning or first letter of a...
Padapitha
Pāda-pīṭha.—(SII 2), a foot-stool. Note: pāda-pīṭha is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glos...
Padapurana
Pādapūraṇa (पादपूरण).—1) filling out a line; P.VI.1.134. 2) an expletive; तु पादपूरणे भेदे समुच...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: