Mathuranatha, aka: Mathurānātha, Mathura-natha, Mathūrānātha; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Mathuranatha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

Mathuranatha in Purana glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mathurānātha (मथुरानाथ).—Is Kṛṣṇa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 36. 31.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Mathuranatha in Chandas glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

1) Mathurānātha (मथुरानाथ) or Mathurānātha Śukla (17th century) was a dynamic scholar contributed to the study of Sanskrit prosody through his four metrical compositions. He was a scholar of dharma, nyāya, stotra, yoga, prosody, poetics, mantra etc. Mathurānātha has composed four metrical compositions, but unfortunately now, none of them are available to us. The works are: 1. Chandaḥkalpalatā, 2. commentary on Chandaśśāstra of Piṅgala, 3. Vṛttadarpaṇa, and 4. Vṛttasudhodaya. All these texts are mentioned in the catalogue of Sanskrit Manuscripts in the private libraries of the north-western provinces, parts. I. & II.

2) Mathurānātha (मथुरानाथ) or Mathurānātha Śukla Mālavīya (C. 1750-1825 C.E.), a native of Mālava (presently Malwa), was a Brahmin by caste; was different from the author of the same name of 17th Cent. He was an authority on jyotiṣa, stotra, yoga, bhakti and chandas. He was the son of Sadānanda, who migrated from Patna to Kāśī. Śivanātha Jharakhandi says in his Bhāratīya Jyotiṣ that Mathurānātha worked in the library of Sanskrit Pāṭhaśālā of Kāśī from 1813 to 1818 C.E. He received the patronage of Dayālucandra, grandfather of Śivaprasāda, the famous king of Kāśī.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mathuranatha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mathurānātha (मथुरानाथ) or Mathūrānātha (मथूरानाथ).—epithets of Kṛṣṇa.

Derivable forms: mathurānāthaḥ (मथुरानाथः), mathūrānāthaḥ (मथूरानाथः).

Mathurānātha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mathurā and nātha (नाथ). See also (synonyms): mathureśa.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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