Manuja, Manujā, Manu-ja: 22 definitions

Introduction:

Manuja means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Manuja (मनुज).—A Viśvedeva.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 203. 13.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Manuja (मनुज) refers to “men” (human), according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 1), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “What means the notion that the works of the Ṛṣis are sound and not so the works of men [i.e., manuja-grathita]? In cases where the matter refers to no mantra, what is there to choose between, when the meaning is the same because the words are different? If Brahmā has declared—‘kṣititanaya divasavāro net śubhakṛta’ and mantra ‘kujadinamaniṣṭam’ what is there to choose between the work of man and that of a Deva?”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): (shaktism)

Manuja (मनुज) refers to a “man”, according to the 17th century Kaulagajamardana (“crushing the Kaula elephant”) authored by Kāśīnātha or Kṛṣṇānandācala.—Accordingly, [as Īśvara said to Pārvatī]: “Listen, O Pārvatī, I shall give a critique of the Pāṣaṇḍas. Knowing this, a wise man (manuja) is not defeated by them. Those devoted to fake observances; those who rebuke the religion of the Vedas; those who have fallen from caste and religious duties; those who have erred and think themselves learned, they are [all] called Pāṣaṇḍas [because] they act contrary to [true] religion. They fall into a terrifying hell until the end of the world. [...]”

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

An eminent upasika mentioned in a list. A.iv.347; AA.ii.791.

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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Manuja (मनुज) refers to a “human being”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, “[...] That on which there is dependence, that is nothing in particular; [...] in the dependent origination, there is no self, being (satva), life-principle (jīva), life-sustaining principle (poṣa), spirit (puruṣa), personality (pudgala), human being (manuja), or man (mānava); in the dependent origination there is no attainment; in the dependent origination there is nothing, and it is effortless, empty, no distinguishing mark, transcendent, no activity, no discursive thinking, and beyond discursive thinking. Thus origination is just the arising of the dharma, and cessation is also the ceasing of the dharma. [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Manuja (मनुज) refers to “men”, according to the Guru Mandala Worship (maṇḍalārcana) ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “Becoming a golden color, liberated from all disease, Best among gods and men (sura-manuja-viśiṣṭa), a bright beautiful moon, Accomplishes the golden prize, born in a royal lineage, In the highest Buddha abode, the one who makes the Mandala”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Manuja (मनुज) refers to “men”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “In this world, fool, how could the body, which is covered in a mass of skin, a skeleton of bones, excessively filled with the smells of a stinking corpse, sitting in the mouth of Yama, the abode of the serpent-lord of disease, be for the pleasure of men (manuja)? [Thus ends the reflection on] impurity”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

manuja : (m.) a human being.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Manuja, (manu+ja, i.e. sprung from Manu, cp. etym. of manussa s. v. ) human being; man A. IV, 159; Sn. 458, 661, 1043 sq.; Dh. 306, 334. Nd2 496 (explanations as “manussa” & “satta”).

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

manuja (मनुज).—m S A man. 2 Mankind.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

manuja (मनुज).—m A man; mankind.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Manuja (मनुज).—a man, mankind. °अधिपः, °अधिपतिः, °ईश्वरः, °पतिः, °राजः (adhipaḥ, °adhipatiḥ, °īśvaraḥ, °patiḥ, °rājaḥ) a king, sovereign. °लोकः (lokaḥ) the world of men; i. e. the earth.

Derivable forms: manujaḥ (मनुजः).

Manuja is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms manu and ja (ज).

--- OR ---

Manujā (मनुजा).—a woman.

Manujā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms manu and (जा).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Manuja (मनुज).—m.

(-jaḥ) A man in general. f.

(-jā) A woman. E. manu the legislator and progenitor of mankind, and ja born, descended.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Manuja (मनुज).—[manu-ja], I. m. A man in general, [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 2, 98. Ii. f. , A woman.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Manuja (मनुज).—[masculine] man (lit. sprung from Manu or men).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Manuja (मनुज) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—(?): Vaidyasarvasva. Sūcīpattra. 24.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Manuja (मनुज):—[=manu-ja] [from manu > man] m. ‘Manu-born’, a man, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) Manujā (मनुजा):—[=manu-jā] [from manu-ja > manu > man] f. a woman, [ib.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Manuja (मनुज):—[manu-ja] (jaḥ) 1. m. Man. f. () Woman.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Manuja (मनुज) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Maṇua.

[Sanskrit to German]

Manuja in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Manuja (ಮನುಜ):—[noun] = ಮನುಷ್ಯ [manushya].

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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