Mammata, Mammaṭa: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Mammata means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Mammaṭa (मम्मट).—An Indian scholar who lived about 1100 A.D. He was a great scholar and critic in Sanskrit and was born in Kashmir. His masterpiece was a great book "Kāvya Prakāśa". It is divided into ten chapters. Each chapter is entitled "Ullāsa". There is a view expressed by some people that Mammaṭa wrote only the first nine chapters of this book and the last chapter was written by another scholar named Alaka.

Numerous commentaries on Mammaṭa’s Kāvya Prakāśa have been published. It is said that Patañjali’s commentator Kayyaṭa was the brother of Mammaṭa. "Śabda Vyāpāra Vicāra" is another book written by Mammaṭa.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mammaṭa (मम्मट).—Name of the author of the Kāvyaprakāśa.

Derivable forms: mammaṭaḥ (मम्मटः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mammaṭa (मम्मट).—[masculine] [Name] of a writer.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Mammaṭa (मम्मट) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—originally mahiman bhaṭṭa of Kāśmīr. A silly tradition by Bhīmasena (Peters. 1, 26. 94) reports that he was a son of Jaiyaṭa and brother of Kaiyaṭa and Uvaṭa: Kāvyaprakāśa. Śabdavyāpāra, metrics. Oudh. Xi, 10. Report. Xvii (Śabdavyāpāravicāra). Saṃgītaratnamālā. Quoted in Saṃgitanārāyaṇa Oxf. 201^a. One stanza of his given in [Subhāshitāvali by Vallabhadeva]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mammaṭa (मम्मट):—m. (for mahima-bhaṭṭa) Name of various writers ([especially] of the author of the Kāvya-prakāśa), [Catalogue(s)]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Mammaṭa (मम्मट):—m. Nomen proprium des Autors des Kāvyaprakāśa und der Saṃgītaratnamālā [Oxforder Handschriften 201,a,36.] Eine Contraction von mahimabhaṭṭa nach [AUFRECHT a. a. O. 246], a, [Nalopākhyāna 1.] mammaṭabhaṭṭa [Weber’s Verzeichniss 228, 1.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Mammaṭa (मम्मट):—m. Nomen proprium eines Autors. Auch bhaṭṭa.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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