Mallaka: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Mallaka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Mallaka (मल्लक) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. VI.10.61) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Mallaka) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

An Elder. As he stood one day looking at a ploughed field a sign arose in him of the size of the field. He enlarged it, induced the five jhanas, and, developing insight, became an arahant (Vsm.123).

He is mentioned as consulting Dighabhanaka Abhaya on some problem connected with jhana. Vsm.265f.

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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Mallaka.—(EI 21) a measure. Note: mallaka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mallaka in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

mallaka : (m.) a vessel; a receiver.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Mallaka, (cp. Sk. mallaka & mallika) 1. a bowl, a vessel (?) used in bathing Vin. II, 106 (mallakena nahāyati; or is it a kind of scrubber? Bdhgh’s explanation of this passage (CV v. I. 4) on p. 315 is not quite clear; mallakaṃ nāma makara-dantike chinditvā mūllakamūla-saṇṭhānena kata-mallakaṃ vuccati; akata° danta achinditvā kataṃ). It may bear some ref. to malla on p. 105 (see malla) & to mallika-makula (see below mallikā).—2. a cup, drinking vessel A. I, 250 (udaka°).—3. a bowl J. III, 21 (kaṃsa°=taṭṭaka).—4. in kheḷa° a spittoon Vin. I, 48; II, 175.—Note. W. Printz in “Bhāsa’s Prākrit. ” p. 45, compares Śaurasenī maḷḷaa, Hindī maḷḷ(a) “cup, ” maliyā “a small vessel (of wood or cocoanut-shell) for holding the oil used in unction, ” mālā “cocoanut-shell, ” and adds: probably a Dravidian word. (Page 525)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mallaka (मल्लक).—

1) A lamp-stand.

2) An oil-vessel, a lampvesssel.

3) A lamp.

4) A cup made out of a cocoanut shell.

5) A tooth.

6) A kind of jasmine.

7) A bowl; मोदकमल्लकं निक्षिप्य (modakamallakaṃ nikṣipya) Pratijñā. Y.3.

Derivable forms: mallakaḥ (मल्लकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Mallaka (मल्लक).—m. (= prec.; Sanskrit Lex. and Pali id., AMg. mallaga, an earthen bowl, [Ardha-Māgadhī Dictionary]; compare khaṇḍa-, koṭṭa-, kroḍa-mallaka), pot, bowl, vessel: Divyāvadāna 172.7, 10; 174.26 mallakaś; 176.21; 177.8; in [bahuvrīhi] cpds. rikta-, pūrṇa- mallaka (regularly preceded by rikta-, pūrṇa-hasta), with empty (full) bowl: Divyāvadāna 171.18 ff.; 172.1, 3, 6; 176.3 ff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mallaka (मल्लक).—mf.

(-llakaḥ-llikā) An oil-vessel, a vessel made of the shell of a cocoanut for holding oil, whether for culinary purposes or for burning as a lamp. m.

(-kaḥ) A tooth. E. mall to hold, aff. vun .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mallaka (मल्लक).—[malla + ka], I. m. 1. A tooth. 2. A leaf to wrap up something, or a cup, [Mṛcchakaṭikā, (ed. Stenzler.)] 126, 9 v. r.; cf. Wilson, Hind. Th. i. 2 ed. 134, n., and Stenzler, n. Ii. m., and f. likā, An oil vessel.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Mallaka (मल्लक) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—poet. [Subhāshitāvali by Vallabhadeva]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mallaka (मल्लक):—[from malla] m. a tooth, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] a lamp-stand, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] a lamp, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] a vessel made out of a cocoa-nut shell, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] any vessel, [Divyāvadāna]

6) [v.s. ...] a cup or leaf in which anything is wrapped, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

7) [v.s. ...] Name of a Brāhman, [Rājataraṅgiṇī]

8) [v.s. ...] [plural] Name of a people, [Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mallaka (मल्लक):—[(kaḥ-kā)] 1. m. f. An oil vessel made of a cocoanut. m. A tooth.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Mallaka (मल्लक) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Mallaga, Mallaya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mallaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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