Kincit, Kim-cid, Kiṃcid, Kimcid, Kiṃcit, Kimcit, Kiñcid, Kincid, Kiñcit: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Kincit means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Kinchit.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Kiñcit (किञ्चित्) refers to “inexplicable” (Śāmbhava state), according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “[...] I will now expound the sixfold introduction to the differentiated (sakala aspect). The Śāmbhava (state), supreme and tranquil, is above the six (Wheels). It is liberation, unique, tranquil, devoid of the Five Voids and beneficial. It is consciousness, supreme and pure. It is the inexplicable (kiñcit) Śāmbhava (state) that is pure consciousness. It is supreme. It is the supreme Nirvāṇa, the body made of consciousness along with Śiva. The subtle, pure consciousness of the Person is said to be subtle and omnipresent. (Thus) consciousness is said to be of three kinds, Individual, Empowered, and Śāmbhava.

2) Kiñcit (किञ्चित्) refers to the “subtle (way)” (to self-realisation), according to the Svacchandabhairavatantra.—The Transmental (unmanā), just below this state, is the reflective awareness of one’s own nature that is directed in a subtle way (kiñcid-aunmukhya) to its self-realisation. It represents the highest and subtlest limit of immanence as the universal Being, which contains and is both being and non-being. At the same time, the energy of the Transmental is the direct means to the supreme state of Non-being. Thus while contemplation of the other lower phases in the development of OṂ bestows yogic powers of an increasing order of perfection, it alone leads to liberation directly. [...]

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram (shaivism)

Kimcit (किम्चित्) refers to the “subtle (movement)” (which is the pulsing radiance of self-luminous consciousness), according to Abhinavagupta’s Tantrāloka verse 3.247-249 and 250cd-251ab.—Accordingly, “(This vibration is that) subtle movement (kimcit-calana) which is the pulsing radiance (of self-luminous consciousness that shines as all things). Independent of all else, it is the wave of the ocean of consciousness, and consciousness is (never) without it. Indeed, it is the nature of the sea to be (at times tranquil) without waves and (at others) full of waves. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kiñcit (किंचित्).—ad (S) Something, somewhat, a little.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kiñcit (किंचित्).—ad A little, somewhat.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kiñcit (किञ्चित्).—ind. 1. Something somewhat. 2. A part, a little. n. kiṃ what, cit to think, affix kvip.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kiṃcid (किंचिद्):—[=kiṃ-cid] [from kiṃ > kim] n. (See 2. ka) ‘something’, Name of a particular measure (= eight handfuls) [commentator or commentary] on [Śāṅkhāyana-gṛhya-sūtra]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kiñcit (किञ्चित्):—[kiñci+t] adv. Something, a little.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Kiñcit (किञ्चित्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Kiṃci.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kincit in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Kiṃcit (किंचित्):—(a) little, somewhat, slight.

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