Gadin, Gaḍin: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Gadin means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: eScholarship: Chapters 1-14 of the Hayasirsa Pancaratra

Gadin (गदिन्) refers to “one who is afflicted with disease”, representing an undesirable characteristic of an Ācārya, according to the 9th-century Hayaśīrṣa-pañcarātra Ādikāṇḍa chapter 3.—The Lord said:—“I will tell you about the Sthāpakas endowed with perverse qualities. He should not construct a temple with those who are avoided in this Tantra. [...] He should not hate the Ācārya, Putraka and others, be a servant of others, a glutton, attendant, prone to disasters, wicked or afflicted with disease (gadin). [...] A god enshrined by any of these named above (viz., gadin), is in no manner a giver of fruit. If a building for Viṣṇu is made anywhere by these excluded types (viz., gadin) then that temple will not give rise to enjoyment and liberation and will yield no reward, of this there is no doubt”.

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Gadin (गदिन्) refers to “one who has a mace” and is used to describe Śiva, according the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.41.—Accordingly, as Viṣṇu and others eulogized Śiva:—“[...] obeisance to you, O lord, who can kill at a distance, in front, to one who has a bow, a trident, a mace (i.e., Gadin) and a ploughshare. Obeisance to the wielder of many weapons, to the destroyer of Daityas and Dānavas, to Sadya, Sadyarūpa and Sadyojāta”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Gaḍin (गडिन्) is the name of a Vīra (hero) who, together with the Ḍākinī named Gaḍinī forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Vāyucakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the vāyucakra refers to one of the three divisions of the dharma-puṭa (‘dharma layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs and Vīras [viz., Gaḍin] are dark blue in color; they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Gadin (गदिन्).—a. ( f.) [गद-इनि (gada-ini)]

1) Armed with a club; किरीटिनं गदिनं चक्रिणं च (kirīṭinaṃ gadinaṃ cakriṇaṃ ca) Bg.11.17.

2) Affected with sickness, diseased. -m. [गदा अस्त्यस्य इनि (gadā astyasya ini)] An epithet of Viṣṇu.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gadin (गदिन्).—m. (-dī) 1. A name of Vishnu. 2. A mace bearer. 3. One armed with a club. 4. A sick man. E. gadā a mace, and ini poss. aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gadin (गदिन्).—i. e. gadā + in, adj. Having a club, [Bhagavadgītā, (ed. Schlegel.)] 11, 17.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gadin (गदिन्).—[adjective] bearing a mace ([Epithet] of Kṛṣṇa).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Gadin (गदिन्):—[from gad] mfn. ([from] da) sick, [Bhāvaprakāśa vii, 14, 96]

2) [v.s. ...] ([from] ) armed with a club (said of Kṛṣṇa), [Mahābhārata vii, 9455; Bhagavad-gītā]

3) [v.s. ...] m. Name of Kṛṣṇa, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gadin (गदिन्):—(dī) 5. m. A mace-bearer; Vishnu; a sick man.

[Sanskrit to German]

Gadin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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