Caturdvipaka, Cāturdvīpaka: 1 definition

Introduction

Caturdvipaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chaturdvipaka.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (C) next»] — Caturdvipaka in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Cāturdvīpaka (चातुर्द्वीपक).—adj., f. °ikā or (rarely) °akā, also as subst. m. (nt. ?) and f. (compare Pali cātuddī°, adj., and prec., next, and caturdvī°), as adj., of, containing, con- sisting of four continents; of the world; as subst., m. (nt. ?) or f., the world, as containing four continents: °aka, masc. adj. with lokadhātu, Gaṇḍavyūha 107.2; 325.3; Śikṣāsamuccaya 282.3, 9; Lalitavistara 149.21 f.; Mahāvyutpatti 3046; adj. with sattva, °pakānāṃ ca sattvānām, and of creatures of the world, Daśabhūmikasūtra 81.17; adj. f. °ikā, with lokadhātu, Gaṇḍavyūha 233.23; subst. m. (nt. ?), madhye cāturdvīpakasya, in the middle of the world, Gaṇḍavyūha 352.10; subst. f., usually °ikā, once at least °akā, world- of-four-continents, but usually regarded as only a part of a lokadhātu, which contains a plurality of cāturdvīpikā: trisāhasramahāsāhasrāyāṃ lokadhātau sarvacāturdvīpa- kāsu Gaṇḍavyūha 380.1, but in 380.3 same phrase with °dvīpikāsu; (tasmin…lokadhātau) madhyamā cāturdvīpikā Gaṇḍavyūha 232.8, the middle earth in this world-system; similarly Gaṇḍavyūha 268.6; 380.26; in Gaṇḍavyūha 373.17 the cāturdvipikā named Bhāgavatī, q.v., is part of a trisāhasramahāsāhasrā lokadhātu, and itself in turn contains a Jambudvīpa.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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