Caturdanta, aka: Catur-danta; 4 Definition(s)

Introduction

Caturdanta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chaturdanta.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Caturdanta in Purana glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Caturdanta (चतुर्दन्त, “four-tusked”) refers to one of the fifty-six vināyakas located at Kāśī (Vārāṇasī), and forms part of a sacred pilgrimage (yātrā), described in the Kāśīkhaṇḍa (Skanda-purāṇa 4.2.57). He is also known as Caturdantavināyaka, Caturdantagaṇeśa and Caturdantavighneśa. These fifty-six vināyakas are positioned at the eight cardinal points in seven concentric circles (8x7). They center around a deity named Ḍhuṇḍhirāja (or Ḍhuṇḍhi-vināyaka) positioned near the Viśvanātha temple, which lies at the heart of Kāśī, near the Gaṅges. This arrangement symbolises the interconnecting relationship of the macrocosmos, the mesocosmos and the microcosmos.

Caturdanta is positioned in the South-Western corner of the fifth circle of the kāśī-maṇḍala. According to Rana Singh (source), his shrine is located at “Nai Sarak, Sanatandharm School, D 49/ 10”. Worshippers of Caturdanta will benefit from his quality, which is defined as “the destroyer of obstacles by glimpse”. His coordinates are: Lat. 25.18627, Lon. 83.00308 (or, 25°11'10.6"N, 83°00'11.1"E) (Google maps)

Kāśī (Vārāṇasī) is a holy city in India and represents the personified form of the universe deluded by the Māyā of Viṣṇu. It is described as a fascinating city which is beyond the range of vision of Giriśa (Śiva) having both the power to destroy great delusion, as well as creating it.

Caturdanta, and the other vināyakas, are described in the Skandapurāṇa (the largest of the eighteen mahāpurāṇas). This book narrates the details and legends surrounding numerous holy pilgrimages (tīrtha-māhātmya) throughout India. It is composed of over 81,000 metrical verses with the core text dating from the before the 4th-century CE.

Source: Wisdom Library: Skanda-purāṇa
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Katha (narrative stories)

Caturdanta in Katha glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Caturdanta (चतुर्दन्त) is the name of an elephant-leader (gaja-yūthapa), according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 62. Accordingly, “... now, once on a time, a leader of a herd of elephants, named Caturdanta, came there [to lake Candrasaras] to drink water, because all the other reservoirs of water were dried up in the drought that prevailed. Then many of the hares [śaśaka], who were the subjects of that king [Śilīmukha], were trampled to death by Caturdanta’s herd, while entering the lake”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Caturdanta, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
context information

Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Caturdanta in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Caturdanta (चतुर्दन्त).—an epithet of Airāvata, the elephant of Indra.

Derivable forms: caturdantaḥ (चतुर्दन्तः).

Caturdanta is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms catur and danta (दन्त).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Caturdanta (चतुर्दन्त).—m.

(-ntaḥ) Indra'S elephant. E. catur four, and danta a tooth.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 396 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Danta
Danta (दन्त).—m. (-ntaḥ) 1. A tooth. 2. The peak of a mountain. 3. The side or ridge of a mount...
Sudanta
Sudanta (सुदन्त).—m. (-ntaḥ) 1. An actor, a dancer. 2. A good tooth. f. (-ntī) The female eleph...
Caturashra
Caturasra (चतुरस्र).—mfn. (-sraḥ-srā-sraṃ) Four cornered, quadrangular. n. (-sraṃ) A square. E....
Caturmukha
Caturmukha (Apabhraṃśa Caumuha=nominative Caumuhu), we see that he was one of the greatest Apab...
Pushpadanta
Puṣpadanta (पुष्पदन्त).—(1) n. of a former Buddha: Mv i.115.9 (here mss. °datta), 16; 116.1; i...
Caturbhuja
1) Caturbhuja (चतुर्भुज) is the father of Rudraṇa and the great-great-grand-father of Kumāramaṇ...
Caturanga
Caturaṅga.—(EI 2), a complete army. Note: caturaṅga is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glos...
Hastidanta
Hastidanta (हस्तिदन्त).—m. (-ntaḥ) 1. A pin or bracket projecting from a wall to hang any thing...
Ekadanta
Ekadanta (एकदन्त).—m. (-ntaḥ) A name of Ganesa: see the preceding. E. eka and danta a tooth.
Dantakashtha
Dantakāṣṭha (दन्तकाष्ठ).—n. (-ṣṭhaṃ) A piece of stick, or of the small branch of a tree used as...
Catushpada
Catuṣpada (चतुष्पद).—or Catuṣpada is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms catur and pada...
Caturyuga
Caturyuga (चतुर्युग) refers to a time period consisting of four times the amount of one Ka...
Dantadhavana
Dantadhāvana (दन्तधावन).—1) cleaning or washing the teeth; अभ्यङ्गोन्मर्दनादर्शदन्तधावाभिषेचनम्...
Gajadanta
Gajadanta (गजदन्त).—1) an elephant's tusk, ivory; कार्योलङ्कार- विधिर्गजदन्तेन प्रशस्तेन (kāryo...
Catur
Catur (चतुर्).—num. a. [cat-uran Uṇ.5.58] (always in pl.; m. catvāraḥ; f. catasraḥ; n. catvāri)...

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