Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 75

Bu-Pc.75.1.1 BD.3.49 … at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the group of six monks, angry, displeased, Vin.4.147 raised the palm of the hand[1] against the group of seventeen monks.[2] These, frightened of a blow,[3] cried out. Monks spoke thus: “Why do you, your reverences, cry out?”

“Your reverences, this group of six monks, angry, displeased, raised the palm of the hand against us.” Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying: “How can this group of six monks, angry, displeased, raise the palm of the hand against the group of seventeen monks?” …

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monks, angry, displeased, raised the palm of the hand against the group of seventeen monks?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

How can you, foolish men, angry, displeased, raise the palm of the hand against the group of seventeen monks? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth: BD.3.50 Whatever monk, angry, displeased, should raise the palm of the hand against a monk, there is an offence of expiation.[4]


Bu-Pc.75.2.1 Whatever means: … monk is to be understood in this case.

Against a monk means: against another monk.

Angry, displeased means: … stubborn.[5]

Should raise the palm of the hand means: if he lifts up[6] the body or something attached to the body, and even at most a lotus-leaf,[7] there is an offence of expiation.


Bu-Pc.75.2.2 If he thinks that one is ordained when he is ordained, (and) angry, displeased, raises the palm of the hand … see Bu-Pc.74.2… There is no offence if, being in some difficulty, he raises the palm of the hand desiring freedom; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Fifth

Footnotes and references:

1.

talasattikaṃ uggiranti. Vinaya Texts i.51 has “shall make use of any threatening gesture,” a rendering governed by the Old Commentary’s explanation, q.v.

3.

Text reads pahārasamucitā. Variant readings: te pahāraṃ pamuccitā; te pahārasaṃmucitā; te pahārasamuccitā. Pali-English Dictionary says of samucita “(saṃ+ucita, pp.of uc to be pleased), suitable, Vin.4.147 (must mean something else here, perhaps ‘hurt’ or ‘frightened’).” Vin-a.878 says that these monks were familiar with blows, having received them before, and that they were frightened. The variant readings suggest that the monks were suitable objects for a blow, but that they escaped a blow which was threatened, not given.

4.

Referred to at Dhp-a.3.50.

5.

= above, BD.3.47.

6.

uccāreti.

7.

Cf. above, BD.3.48.

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