Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 55

Bu-Pc.55.1.1 BD.2.396 … at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the group of six monks frightened[1] the group of seventeen monks. These, being frightened, cried out. Monks spoke thus:

“Why do you, your reverences, cry out?”

“Your reverences, this group of six monks frightened us.”

Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can the group of six monks frighten a monk?” … see Bu-Pc.52.1 … “… should be set forth:


Bu-Pc.55.2.1Whatever monk should frighten a monk, there is an offence of expiation.


Whatever means: is monk to be understood in this case.

Monk means: another monk.

Should frighten means: if one who is ordained, desirous of frightening one who is ordained, arranges a form or a sound or a smell or a taste or a touch,[2] whether he is afraid or whether he is not afraid, there is an offence of expiation. If he points out the wilds of thieves, or the wilds of beasts of prey, or the wilds of goblins,[3] whether he is afraid or whether he is not afraid, there is an offence of expiation.


Bu-Pc.55.2.2 If he thinks that he is ordained when he is ordained (and) frightens (him), there is an offence of expiation.

BD.2.397 If he is in doubt as to whether he is ordained … If he thinks that he is not ordained when he is ordained (and) frightens (him), there is an offence of expiation. If he is desirous of frightening one who is not ordained (and) arranges a form … a touch, whether he is afraid or whether he is not afraid, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he points out the wilds of thieves … or whether he is not afraid, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that he is ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. Vin.4.115 If he is in doubt as to whether he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that he is not ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing.[4]


Bu-Pc.55.2.3 There is no offence if, not desirous of frightening, he arranges a form or a sound or a smell or a taste or a touch, or points out the wilds of thieves or the wilds of beasts of prey or the wilds of goblins; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Fifth

Footnotes and references:

1.

bhiṃsāpenti.

2.

Cf. BD.1.133f. (= Vin.3.77f.). Vin-a.862 says, “offering a form and so on is to be explained according to the meaning in manussaviggaha,” human form—i.e., in Commentary, on Bu-Pj.3.

3.

pisācakantāra. At Ja.1.99 five kinds of kantāra are given, the first two as above and three others; each is defined. Four kinds at Cnd.630.

4.

Doubtless should read, as in Bu-Pc.54, anāpatti, no offence.

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