Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 52

Bu-Pc.52.1.1 BD.2.387 … at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the group of six monks made one of the group of seventeen monks laugh by tickling him with the fingers. This monk, faint and unable to get his breath, died.[1] Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can the group of six monks Vin.4.111 make a monk laugh by tickling him with the fingers?” …

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monks … with the fingers?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How can you, foolish men … with the fingers? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

In tickling with the fingers there is an offence of expiation.”


Bu-Pc.52.2.1 Tickling with the fingers means: if one who is ordained desiring to make laugh one who is ordained, rubs[2] the BD.2.388 body with the body, there is an offence of expiation.


Bu-Pc.52.2.2 If he thinks that he is ordained when he is ordained, (and) makes him laugh by tickling with the fingers, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether he is ordained … If he thinks that he is not ordained when he is ordained … an offence of expiation. If he rubs something attached to the body[3] with the body, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he rubs the body with something attached to the body … wrong-doing. If he rubs something attached to the body with something attached to the body … wrong-doing. If he rubs the body with something that may be cast,[4] there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he rubs something attached to the body with something that may be cast … wrong-doing. If he rubs something that may be cast with something that may be cast, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he rubs the body of one who is not ordained[5] with the body, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he rubs something attached to the body with the body … the body with something attached to the body … something attached to the body with something attached to the body … the body with something that may be cast … something attached to the body with something that may be cast … something that may be cast with something that may be cast, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that he is ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that he is not ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing.[6]


Bu-Pc.52.2.3 BD.2.389 There is no offence if, not desiring laughter, he rubs (him) if there is something to be done[7]; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Second

Footnotes and references:

1.

= Vin.3.84 (BD.1.146f.). Though occurring in the pārājika section, this offence is there said to be one not involving defeat; but as is sometimes the case, it is not said what kind of offence it is. This suggests that Vin.3.84 was formulated earlier than Bu-Pc.52. See BD.1 Introduction, p.xxxvi, for suggestion why the offence of causing death by this treatment is not a pārājika; also for some translations of aṅgulipatodaka. So-sor-thar-pa, p.63, translated S.C. Vidyabhusana, 1915, p.30, gives, “pokes a person with the finger”; Le Prātimokṣa-sūtra des Sarvāstivādins, translated Huber, J. Bu-As., Nov, Bu-Pc.63chatouille quelqu’un avec le doigt.” Buddhaghosa, Vin-a.860, defines as aṅgulīhi upakacchādighaṭṭanaṃ vuccati, “It is called striking (or touching, ghattana) the arm-pits (loins, legs, upakacchd), and so on, with the fingers.”

2.

āmasati, see BD.1.203, n.6.

3.

kāyapaṭibaddha. Cf. BD.1.204ff. = Vin.3.120ff.

4.

nissaggiya. Cf. BD.1.204ff. = Vin.3.120ff.

5.

anupassampannaṃ kāyena kāyaṃ āmasati. Vin-a.860 says that he may touch a nun for amusement, instead of one not ordained.

6.

This surely is an error for anāpatti, no offence.

7.

sati karaṇīye = above, BD.2.381. Cf. sati paccaye at Vin.4.83, Vin.4.85ff.

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