Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 74

Bu-Pc.74.1.1 BD.3.47 … at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that Vin.4.146 time the group of six monks, angry, displeased, gave the group of seventeen monks[1] a blow; these cried out. Monks spoke thus: “Why do you, your reverences, cry out?”

“Your reverences, this group of six monks, angry, displeased, gave us a blow.” Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying: “How can this group of six monks, angry, displeased, give monks a blow?” …

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monks, angry, displeased, gave monks a blow?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How can you, foolish men, angry, displeased, give monks a blow? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

Whatever monk, angry, displeased, should give a monk a blow, there is an offence of expiation.”


Bu-Pc.74.2.1 Whatever means: … monk is to be understood in this case.

A monk means: another monk.

Angry, displeased means: dissatisfied, the mind worsened, stubborn.[2]

Should give a blow means: if he gives a blow with the body or with something attached to the body or with BD.3.48 something that may be cast,[3] and even with a lotus-leaf,[4] there is an offence of expiation.[5]


Bu-Pc.74.2.2 If he thinks that one is ordained when he is ordained, (and) angry, displeased, gives a blow, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether one is ordained … If he thinks that one is not ordained when he is ordained, (and) angry, displeased … offence of expiation. If angry, displeased, he gives a blow to one who is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that one is ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether one is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that one is not ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing.[6]


Bu-Pc.74.2.3 There is no offence if, being in some difficulty, he gives a blow desiring freedom[7]; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Fourth

Footnotes and references:

2.

= Vin.3.255 = Vin.4.236, Vin.4.238. Cf. Vin.3.163 where these five words are used to explain duṭṭho doso, “malignant, malicious”; see BD.1.281 and cf. DN.iii.238; MN.i.101.

3.

Cf. Vin.3.74 = BD.1.129. Cf. BD.1.207, BD.1.218, where commentarial explanations of kāyapaṭibaddha, “something attached to the body,” are cited.

4.

uppalapatta. Cf. next Pācittiya and Bi-Pc.3, Bi-Pc.4.

5.

Referred to at Dhp-a.3.48.

6.

Surely should read anāpatti, no offence.

7.

kenaci viheṭhiyamāno mokkhādhippāyo. Vin-a.877 says if it is on account of a man or an animal, it is no offence to strike a blow with the body, with something attached to it, or with something that may be cast.

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