Yamadamshtraka, Yamadaṃṣṭraka: 2 definitions

Introduction:

Yamadamshtraka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Yamadaṃṣṭraka can be transliterated into English as Yamadamstraka or Yamadamshtraka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Yamadamshtraka in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Yamadaṃṣṭraka (यमदंष्ट्रक) is the name of a rākṣasa king, who occupied the city known as Śailapura after devouring its previous king Vīrabhuja, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 42. He is also known as Yamadaṃṣṭra.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Yamadaṃṣṭraka, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Kavya book cover
context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

Discover the meaning of yamadamshtraka or yamadamstraka in the context of Kavya from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Yamadamshtraka in Shaivism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

Yamadaṃṣṭraka (यमदंष्ट्रक) is the name of a rākṣasa chief, presiding over Nitala, according to the Parākhyatantra 5.44-45. Nitala refers to one of the seven pātālas (‘subterranean paradise’). The word pātāla in this tantra refers to subterranean paradises for seekers of otherworldly pleasures and each the seven pātālas is occupied by a regent of the daityas, nāgas and rākṣasas.

The Parākhyatantra is an old Śaiva-siddhānta tantra dating from before the 10th century.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of yamadamshtraka or yamadamstraka in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Help me keep this site Ad-Free

For over a decade, this site has never bothered you with ads. I want to keep it that way. But I humbly request your help to keep doing what I do best: provide the world with unbiased truth, wisdom and knowledge.

Let's make the world a better place together!

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: