Yamadamshtra, aka: Yamadamṣṭra, Yama-damshtra; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Yamadamshtra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Yamadamṣṭra can be transliterated into English as Yamadamstra or Yamadamshtra, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Katha (narrative stories)

1) Yamadamṣṭra (यमदम्ष्ट्र) is a name of the chief of the Asuras, during the battle with the gods, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 9. And in chapter 42 there is mention of a rākṣasa king named Yamadaṃṣṭraka, who occupied the city known as Śailapura after devouring its previous king Vīrabhuja.

2) Yamadamṣṭra (यमदम्ष्ट्र) is the name of a rākṣaka whose arm was cut off by Vidūṣaka at Pauṇḍravardhana, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 18. Their story was told by Udayana (king of Vatsa) in order to demonstratrate to his ministers that a brave man by himself without any support obtains prosperity.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Yamadamṣṭra, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
context information

Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

yamadaṃṣṭrā (यमदंष्ट्रा).—f (S) pop. yamadāḍha f The jaw-tooth of Yama. A common term for the days of the period comprising the last eight days of ashwin and the whole month of Kartik. As the word is used plurally it expresses that whole period. It is so called because it is a period of general sickness. yamācyā dāḍhēnta asaṇēṃ-paḍaṇēṃ-sāmpaḍaṇēṃ-jāṇēṃ To be in, fall into, or be caught in the jaws of Death, lit.: also, figuratively, to be under or fall under some great tormentor or great trouble. yamācyā dāḍhēnta ghālaṇēṃ-ṭākaṇēṃ &c. To cast into &c.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Yamadaṃṣṭrā (यमदंष्ट्रा).—'Yama's tooth', the jaws of death.

-ṣṭrāḥ pl.) the last eight days of the month Aśvina and the whole of Kārtika (regarded as a period of general sickness).

Yamadaṃṣṭrā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms yama and daṃṣṭrā (दंष्ट्रा).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 581 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Yama
Yama (यम) refers to a deity that was once worshipped in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) according to ...
Pranayama
Prāṇāyāma (प्राणायाम, “breath control”) refers to one of the six members (aṅga) of the Ṣaḍaṅgay...
Yamaduta
Yamadūta (यमदूत).—One of the Brahmavādī sons of Viśvāmitra. (Mahābhārata Anuśāsana Parva, Chapt...
Yamantaka
Yamāntaka (यमान्तक).—an epithet of 1) Śiva. 2) of Yama. Derivable forms: yamāntakaḥ (यमान्तकः)....
Yamayatana
Yamayātanā (यमयातना).—the tortures inflicted by Yama upon sinners after death, (the word is som...
Damshtra
Daṃṣṭrā (दंष्ट्रा).—[daṃś-ṣṭran ṭāp] A large tooth, tusk, fang; Rām. 2.7.2; प्रसह्य मणिमुद्धरेन...
Yamadanda
yamadaṇḍa (यमदंड).—m (S) The punishment inflicted upon sinners by Yama.
Vajradamshtra
1) Vajradaṃṣṭra (वज्रदंष्ट्र).—A ferocious giant who was a follower of Rāvaṇa. In Vālmīki Rāmāy...
Mahadamshtra
Mahādaṃṣṭra (महादंष्ट्र) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.44.95, IX.44.97) and r...
Tikshnadamshtra
Tīkṣṇadaṃṣṭra (तीक्ष्णदंष्ट्र) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. XIV.8.21, XIV.8) an...
Yamapurusha
Yamapuruṣa (यमपुरुष).—Yama's servant or minister. Derivable forms: yamapuruṣaḥ (यमपुरुषः).Yamap...
Yamavrata
Yamavrata (यमव्रत).—1) an observance or vow made to Yama. 2) an impartial punishment (as given ...
Yamakinkara
Yamakiṅkara (यमकिङ्कर).—a messenger of death. Derivable forms: yamakiṅkaraḥ (यमकिङ्करः).Yamakiṅ...
Yamaghanta
Yamaghaṇṭa (यमघण्ट) or Yamaghaṇṭatantra refers to one of the twenty Bhūtatantras, belonging to ...
Shukladamshtra
Śukladaṃṣṭra (शुक्लदंष्ट्र) refers to “white canine teeth” and represents the fifty-fifth of th...

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