Sphatikamala, Sphatika-mala, Sphaṭikamālā: 2 definitions

Introduction:

Sphatikamala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)

Sphaṭikamālā (स्फटिकमाला) refers to a “rosary of crystals” and represents one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “accessories” of a detiy commonly seen depicted in Hindu iconography, defined according to texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—The śilpa texts have classified the various accessories under the broad heading of āyudha or karuvi (implement), including even flowers, animals, and musical instruments. The other miscellaneous articles found as attributes in the hands of the deities are, for example, Tulasīmālā.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

Discover the meaning of sphatikamala in the context of Shilpashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Sphatikamala in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Sphaṭikamālā (स्फटिकमाला) refers to a “garland of crystal beads” and is used to describe Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.31 (“Description of Śiva’s magic”).—Accordingly, after the Gods eulogised Śiva: “Then the lord Śiva who is favourably disposed to his devotees, the lord of magic and free from aberrations went to the lord of mountains. [...] He was in the guise of a saintly Brahmin. He was repeating the name of Viṣṇu with devotion. He had the garland of crystal beads (sphaṭikamālā) in his hand and the Śālagrama stone round his neck. On seeing that extraordinary guest, Himavat with his attendants stood up in reverence and prostrated before him with devotion. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of sphatikamala in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Help me keep this site Ad-Free

For over a decade, this site has never bothered you with ads. I want to keep it that way. But I humbly request your help to keep doing what I do best: provide the world with unbiased truth, wisdom and knowledge.

Let's make the world a better place together!

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: