Shoshani, Śoṣaṇī: 1 definition

Introduction

Shoshani means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śoṣaṇī can be transliterated into English as Sosani or Shoshani, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Ṣaṭsāhasra-saṃhitā

1) Śoṣaṇī (शोषणी):—One of the twelve guṇas associated with Vahni, the third seat of the Svādhiṣṭhāna-chakra. According to tantric sources such as the Śrīmatottara-tantra and the Gorakṣasaṃhitā (Kādiprakaraṇa), these twelve guṇas are represented as female deities. According to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā however, they are explained as particular syllables. They (eg. Śoṣaṇī) only seem to play an minor role with regard to the interpretation of the Devīcakra (first of five chakras, as taught in the Kubjikāmata-tantra).

2) Śoṣaṇī (शोषणी, “Drying up”):—Eight of the eight Mātṛs born from the body of Bhānumatī, according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra. These eight sub-manifestations (mātṛ), including Śoṣaṇī, embody several qualities expressive of the sun’s burning heat and glaring light. They are presided over by the Bhairava Ruru. Bhānumatī is the sixth of the Eight Mahāmātṛs, residing within the Mātṛcakra (third of the five cakras) and represents the sun.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of shoshani or sosani in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: