Sarpakundala, Sarpakuṇḍala, Sarpa-kundala: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Sarpakundala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstra

Sarpakuṇḍala (सर्पकुण्डल):—One of the five kinds of commonly known ear-ornaments (kuṇḍala). This ornament is shaped like a Sarpa (‘cobra’).

Source: Shodhganga: Vaisnava Agamas And Visnu Images

Sarpakuṇḍala (सर्पकुण्डल) refers to one of the various types of “ear-ornaments” (karṇabhūṣaṇa or kuṇḍala), as defined in treatises such as the Pāñcarātra, Pādmasaṃhitā and Vaikhānasa-āgamas, extensively dealing with the technical features of temple art, iconography and architecture in Vaishnavism.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

Discover the meaning of sarpakundala in the context of Shilpashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Sarpakundala in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Sarpakuṇḍala (सर्पकुण्डल) refers to “earrings made of snakes” and is used to visualize Bhairava, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “[...] His body is adorned on the left (by his consort) and he is adorned with a garland of wild flowers. He wears earrings made of snakes [i.e., sarpakuṇḍala-lambana] and his sacred thread is Vāsuki. The Lord is adorned with tinkling anklets and sits on a ghost in the lotus posture. He is adorned with the five insignia and a garland of severed heads that hangs from his neck up to his feet. He dances with the bliss of wine and is accompanied by heroes and Bhairavas. Sixty-four Yoginīs and great mothers encompass him. He is endowed with sixty-four energies and adorned with ghosts and demons. O Śambhu, Bhairava is said to have as his seat (āsana) the Supreme Goddess”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of sarpakundala in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: