Patralekha, Patralekhā, Patra-lekha: 3 definitions

Introduction

Patralekha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Patralekhā (पत्रलेखा) refers to a type of ornament for the cheeks (gaṇḍa or kapola) to be worn by females, according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 23. Patralekhā is composed of the Sanskrit words patra (leaf) and lekhā (border, stroke). Such ornaments for females should be used in cases of human females and celestial beings (gods and goddesses).

Ābharaṇa (‘ornaments’, eg., patralekhā) is a category of alaṃkāra, or “decorations”, which in turn is a category of nepathya, or “costumes and make-up”, the perfection of which forms the main concern of the Āhāryābhinaya, or “extraneous representation”, a critical component for a successful dramatic play.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (P) next»] — Patralekha in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Patralekhā (पत्रलेखा) is the name of a court-lady in service of king Vikramāditya, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 122. Accordingly, “... at that time the forest-fire of separation of that King Vikramāditya began to burn more fiercely, fanned by the eastern breeze. Then the following cries were heard among the ladies of his court: ‘Hāralatā, bring ice! Citrāṅgī, sprinkle him with sandalwood juice! Patralekhā, make a bed cool with lotus leaves! Kandarpasenā, fan him with plantain leaves!’ And in course of time the cloudy season, terrible with lightning, passed away for that king, but the fever of love, burning with the sorrow of separation, did not pass away”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Patralekhā, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (P) next»] — Patralekha in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Patralekhā (पत्रलेखा) or Patrarekhā.—f. (khā) Decoratien of the face or person, by means of fragrant pigments, consisting of Sandal, saffron, musk, &c. E. patra a leaf, and lekhā a line.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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