Mundi, Muṇḍī, Muṇḍi, Mundin, Muṇḍin, Mumdi: 24 definitions

Introduction:

Mundi means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Muṇḍī (मुण्डी, “bald”):—One of the nine Dūtī presided over by one of the nine bhaivaravas named Kapāla (emanation of Ananta, who is the central presiding deity of Dūtīcakra), according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra and the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā. The names of these nine Dūtīs seem to express their involvement in yogic practices.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Muṇḍī (मुण्डी).—A female follower of Subrahmaṇya. (Śloka 17, Chapter 46, Śalya Parva).

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Muṇḍin (मुण्डिन्) refers to “one who has a shaven head”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.5.4 (“The Tripuras are initiated).—Accordingly, as Sanatkumāra narrated to Vyāsa: “For causing obstacles in their virtuous activities, Viṣṇu of great brilliance, created a Puruṣa born of himself. He had a shaven head (muṇḍin), wore dirty clothes, held a woven wicker vessel in his hand and a roll of cotton in his hand which he shook at every step. His hands tucking at the cloth were weak. His face was pale and weak. In a faltering voice he was muttering—‘Dharma, Dharma’. [...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Muṇḍi (मुण्डि).—A heretic; not fit for śrāddha.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 14. 40; 15. 42, 62.

1b) A name of Vighneśvara.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 44. 70.

1c) One of the four sons of the 33rd kalpa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 23. 59.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Muṇḍin (मुण्डिन्) refers to “one who has a shaved head” and is used to describe Śaṃkara (i.e., Bhairava), according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, as the Goddess (i.e., Khageśī) said to the God (i.e., Bhairava), “[...] Being one who has matted hair, shaved head [i.e., muṇḍin], (having a) topknot, carrying a skull, smeared with ashes or wearing the five insignias—O god, (none of this) leads to accomplishment in the Kula tradition. [...]”.

2) Muṇḍin (मुण्डिन्) refers to “one who has a shaved head”, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “Or else, (he may be an ascetic who) always lives in a cave and eats roots, wears bark clothes, keeps silence and is firm (in the observance of his ascetic’s) vow; whether he has dreadlocks or shaved head [i.e., muṇḍin], he is ever intent on the practice of chastity. He knows the reality of concentration and meditation and does not keep the company of the worldly(-minded). [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Kalpa (Formulas, Drug prescriptions and other Medicinal preparations)

Source: archive.org: Science And Technology In Medievel India (kalpa)

Muṇḍī (मुण्डी) or Muṇḍīkalpa refers to Kalpa (medicinal preparation) described in the Auṣadhikalpa, as mentioned in A. Rahman’s Science and Technology in Medievel India: A bibliography of source materials in Sanskrit, Arabic and Persian.—Ancient and medieval India produced a wide range of scientific manuscripts and major contributions lie in the field of medicine, astronomy and mathematics, besides covering encyclopedic glossaries and technical dictionaries.—The Auṣadhikalpa is a medical work of the type of Materia Medica giving twenty-six medical preparations [e.g., Muṇḍī-kalpa] to be used as patent medicines against various diseases.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Mundi in the Hindi language is the name of a plant identified with Sphaeranthus africanus L. from the Asteraceae (Sunflower) family having the following synonyms: Sphaeranthus ovalis, Sphaeranthus alatus, Sphaeranthus microcephalus. For the possible medicinal usage of mundi, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Mundi [ಮುಂಡೀ] in the Kannada language is the name of a plant identified with Sphaeranthus indicus L. from the Asteraceae (Sunflower) family.

Mundi [ಮುಂಡಿ] in the Kannada language is the name of a plant identified with Alocasia macrorrhizos (L.) G.Don from the Araceae (Arum) family having the following synonyms: Alocasia indica, Alocasia montana.

Mundi in the Hindi language is the name of a plant identified with Mimosa hamata from the Mimosaceae (Touch-me-not) family having the following synonyms: Mimosa armata.

Mundi in the Kannada language is the name of a plant identified with Memecylon randerianum S.M.Almeida & M.R.Almeida from the Melastomataceae (Melastome) family having the following synonyms: Memecylon malabaricum Cogn..

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

1) Mundi in India is the name of a plant defined with Memecylon edule in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices.

2) Mundi is also identified with Memecylon malabaricum It has the synonym Memecylon malabaricum Kostel. (etc.).

3) Mundi is also identified with Mitragyna parvifolia It has the synonym Nauclea parvifolia Roxb. (etc.).

4) Mundi is also identified with Sphaeranthus africanus It has the synonym Sphaeranthus microcephalus Willd. (etc.).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Proceedings of the Indian Science Congress Association (1992)
· Observ. Naucl. Indic. (1839)
· Taxon (1975)
· Species Plantarum (1753)
· Bulletin of Miscellaneous Information, Royal Gardens, Kew (1924)
· Journal of Cytology and Genetics (1998)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Mundi, for example diet and recipes, extract dosage, health benefits, chemical composition, side effects, pregnancy safety, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

muṇḍī (मुंडी).—f A plant, Sphœranthus Indicus.

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muṇḍī (मुंडी).—f (muṇḍa S) The head. 2 m (Because they shave their heads wholly, i.e. keep not the śēṇḍī or crown-lock). A contemptuous term for a gōsāvī or sannyāsī, shaveling, bald head. 2 Kings. ii. 23. 3 f pl A term in the arena or gymnasium for the shoulders and hips. Ex. cāra hī muṇḍyā cīta (kēlyā or jhālyā).

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

muṇḍī (मुंडी) [-ḍhī, -ढी].—f The head.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Muṇḍin (मुण्डिन्).—a. [muṇḍa-ini]

1) Shaven, bald, bald-pated; जटिलो मुण्डी लुञ्चितकेशः (jaṭilo muṇḍī luñcitakeśaḥ) Charpata. S.4; वामनो विकटो मुण्डी (vāmano vikaṭo muṇḍī) Rām.7.16.8.

2) Hornless. -m

1) A barber.

2) An epithet of Śiva.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Muṇḍi (मुण्डि).—f. (perhaps muṇḍī Deśīn 6.133 = Sanskrit nīraṅgī), veil (?): puṣpalokamayīṃ (? see puṣpaloka) muṇḍiṃ lak- ṣaṇopetāṃ kṛtvā, paṭasyāgrataḥ kṛtapuraścaraṇaḥ… (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa 691.25.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Muṇḍin (मुण्डिन्).—m. (-ṇḍī) 1. A barber. 2. Siva. E. muṇḍa shaving, aff. ini .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Muṇḍin (मुण्डिन्).—i. e. muṇḍaya + in, m. A barber.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Muṇḍin (मुण्डिन्).—[adjective] = [preceding], also hornless.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Muṇḍī (मुण्डी):—[from muṇḍa > muṇḍ] f. Sphaerantus Hirtus, [Bhāvaprakāśa]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of one of the Mātṛs attending on Skanda, [Mahābhārata]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Muṇḍin (मुण्डिन्):—[from muṇḍ] mfn. shaven, bald (also applied to Śiva), [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa; Kāmandakīya-nītisāra]

2) [v.s. ...] hornless, [Bhāvaprakāśa]

3) [v.s. ...] m. a barber, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Muṇḍin (मुण्डिन्):—(ṇḍī) 5. m. A barber.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Muṇḍin (मुण्डिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Muṃḍi.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mundi in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Muṃḍī (मुंडी):—(nf) a shaven-headed woman; the medicinal plant—Spluranthus indicus; head (a) shaven-headed.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Muṃḍi (मुंडि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Muṇḍin.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Muṃḍi (ಮುಂಡಿ):—

1) [noun] that which is bald or shaven.

2) [noun] a tree the branches of which are cut off.

3) [noun] a hornless or anterless animal.

4) [noun] a man whose occupation is cutting hair, shaving and trimming beards etc.; a barber.

5) [noun] the plant Commiphora myrrha ( = Bolsamodendron myrrha) of Burseraceae family.

6) [noun] a man who has taken up sanyāsa, (the state of rejecting all worldly possessions) and has shaven his head.

7) [noun] a wooden pestle, not having metal rings at the ends.

--- OR ---

Muṃḍi (ಮುಂಡಿ):—[noun] = ಮುಂಡಿಗೆ [mumdige]3.

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Muṃḍi (ಮುಂಡಿ):—

1) [noun] the plant Alocasia macrorrhiza of Araceae family.

2) [noun] the tree Memecylon umbellatum ( = M. edule) of Melastomataceae family; iron wood tree.

3) [noun] the thistle plant Sphaeranthus indicus of Asteraceae family.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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