Kshobhini, Kṣobhiṇī: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Kshobhini means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Kṣobhiṇī can be transliterated into English as Ksobhini or Kshobhini, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Kshobhini in Shaivism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Ṣaṭsāhasra-saṃhitā

Kṣobhiṇī (क्षोभिणी):—One of the twelve guṇas associated with Kāma, the second seat of the Svādhiṣṭhāna-chakra. According to tantric sources such as the Śrīmatottara-tantra and the Gorakṣasaṃhitā (Kādiprakaraṇa), these twelve guṇas are represented as female deities. According to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā however, they are explained as particular syllables. They (e.g. Kṣobhiṇī) only seem to play an minor role with regard to the interpretation of the Devīcakra (first of five chakras, as taught in the Kubjikāmata-tantra).

She is also known by the name Kṣobhaṇī, according to the Gorakṣa-saṃhitā.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Saṅgītaśiromaṇi

Kṣobhiṇī (क्षोभिणी) refers to one of the twenty-two quarters tones (śruti) existing within an octave, according to the Saṅgīta-ratnākara (“ocean of music and dance”). This work is an important Sanskrit treatise dealing with ancient Indian musicology (gāndharva-śāstra), composed by Śārṅgadeva in the 13th century and deals with both Carnatic and Hindustani music. Kṣobhiṇī has a frequency of 465.1121Hz.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: archive.org: Illustrations of Indian Music and Dance in Western Indian Style

Kṣobhiṇī (क्षोभिणी, “agitating”).—Illustration of Kṣobhiṇī-śruti according to 15th century art:—The colour of her body is golden. She holds a vīṇā with both hands. The colour of her scarf is rosy; the lower garment is yellow with a design of black colour and borders of red colour. A gharment of skyblue colour with a crimson-coloured design and golden dots is on the waist.

The illustrations (of, for example Kṣobhiṇī) are found scattered throughout ancient Jain manuscripts from Gujarat. The descriptions of these illustrations of this citrāvalī are based on the ślokas of Vācanācārya Gaṇi Sudhākalaśa’s Saṅgītopaniṣatsāroddhāra (14th century) and Śārṅgadeva’s Saṅgītaratnākara (13th century).

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Kshobhini in Shaktism glossary
Source: Manblunder: Lalitha Sahasranama

Kṣobhiṇī (क्षोभिणी).—The 466th name (nāma) of Lalitā in the lalitāsahasranāma.—Kṣobhiṇī causes creative pulsation or throbbing in Śiva for creation. Kṣobha means shaking or agitation. As a result of this throbbing Śiva makes the souls or puruṣas to merge with prakṛti to commence the process of creation. The soul or puruṣa can manifest only if it interacts with prakṛti, which is also known as the Nature. This process is known as the creative Self-unfolding act. It is only the prakṛti that unfolds the act of creation.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Kṣobhiṇī (क्षोभिणी) refers to one of the ten gestures (daśamudrā or mudrā-daśaka) of the Goddess Nityā Sundarī, according to the Kāmasiddhi-stuti (also Vāmakeśvarī-stuti) and the Vāmakeśvaratantra (also known as Nityāṣoḍaśikārṇava).—[...] Although the Vāmakeśvaratantra does not assign a place for the gestures (mudrā) in the maṇḍala, it does describe them and asks the worshipper to use them during the worship. As found in the third chapter of the Vāmakeśvaratantra, these ten gestures are [e.g., kṣobhiṇī, ...]

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kshobhini in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣobhiṇī (क्षोभिणी):—[from kṣubh] f. (in music) Name of a Śruti.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kshobhini in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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