Krishnavatara, aka: Kṛṣṇāvatāra, Krishna-avatara; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Krishnavatara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Kṛṣṇāvatāra can be transliterated into English as Krsnavatara or Krishnavatara, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Krishnavatara in Shilpashastra glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kṛṣṇāvatāra (कृष्णावतार) or Kṛṣṇa is one of the daśāvatāra (ten incarnations) of Viṣṇu, is found depicted at the  Kallazhagar Temple in  Madurai, which represents a sacred place for the worship of Viṣṇu.—[in Kṛṣṇāvatāra, ] Kṛṣṇa is found with two hands holding the flute near his mouth as if playing on it.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)
Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

Discover the meaning of krishnavatara or krsnavatara in the context of Shilpashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Krishnavatara in Marathi glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

kṛṣṇāvatāra (कृष्णावतार).—m (S) The incarnation of viṣṇu under the form kṛṣṇa.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kṛṣṇāvatāra (कृष्णावतार).—m The incarnation of viṣṇu under the form kṛṣṇa.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of krishnavatara or krsnavatara in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 2096 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Krishna
Kṛṣṇā (कृष्णा) refers to one the twenty-four Horā (astronomical) Goddess to be invoked during p...
Avatara
Avatāra (अवतार).—n. (-raṃ) 1. Descent, especially of a deity from heaven; the appearance of any...
Krishnapaksha
Kṛṣṇapakṣa (कृष्णपक्ष) or Vadyapakṣa refers to the dark half of a month.—A month is divided int...
Dashavatara
Daśāvatāra (दशावतार).—m. (-raḥ) A name of Vishnu. E. daśa ten, and avatāra descent; the deity o...
Krishnaveni
Kṛṣṇāveṇī (कृष्णावेणी) is the name of a river and rises from the Sahya mountain. It is the unit...
Krishnajina
Kṛṣṇājinā (कृष्णाजिना).—(= Pali Kaṇhājinā), n. of the daughter of Viśvaṃtara: Jm 59.22 ff.; in ...
Matsyavatara
Matsyāvatāra (मत्स्यावतार) or Matsya is one of the daśāvatāra (ten incarnations) of Viṣṇu, is f...
Krishnavarna
Kṛṣṇavarṇa (कृष्णवर्ण).—mfn. (-rṇa-rṇā-rṇaṃ) 1. Black or dark blue, A Sudra. 2. A name of Rahu ...
Krishnagiri
Kṛṣṇagiri (कृष्णगिरि) is the name of a hill mentioned in the Kanherī cave inscription of Pullaś...
Ankavatara
Aṅkāvatāra (अङ्कावतार).—when an act, hinted by persons at the end of the preceding act, is brou...
Narasimhavatara
Narasiṃhāvatāra (नरसिंहावतार) or Narasiṃha is one of the daśāvatāra (ten incarnations) of Viṣṇu...
Krishnajanmashtami
Kṛṣṇajanmāṣṭamī (कृष्णजन्माष्टमी) refers to a religious rite (pūjā) or observance (vrata) ...
Amshavatara
Aṃśāvatāra (अंशावतार).—The incarnation of God on earth is called avatāra. When the incarnation ...
Krishnasara
Kṛṣṇaśāra (कृष्णशार).—m. (-raḥ) The black antelope: see kṛṣṇasāra.--- OR --- Kṛṣṇasāra (कृष्णसा...
Krishnavena
Kṛṣṇaveṇā (कृष्णवेणा) refers to the name of a River mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.9.20,...

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