Kami, Kāmi: 14 definitions

Introduction:

Kami means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Kāmī (कामी) is another name for Ṛṣabhaka, a medicinal plant possibly identified with Microstylis muscifera Ridley which is a synonym of Malaxis muscifera (Lindl.) or “fly bearing malaxis” from the Orchidaceae or “orchid” family of flowering plants, according to verse 5.14-16 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fifth chapter (parpaṭādi-varga) of this book enumerates sixty varieties of smaller plants (kṣudra-kṣupa). Together with the names Kāmī and Ṛṣabhaka, there are a total of twenty Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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India history and geography

Source: Shodhganga: Vernacular architecture of Assam with special reference to Brahmaputra Valley

Kami is an Assamese term referring to “bamboo lath / splinter”.—It appears in the study dealing with the vernacular architecture (local building construction) of Assam whose rich tradition is backed by the numerous communities and traditional cultures.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kami : (aor. of kamati) went; entered into. || kāmī (adj.), one who possesses the objects of sensual pleasures; (in cpds.) desirous of.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kamī (कमी).—a ( P) Deficient, wanting, short.

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kāmī (कामी).—a (kāma Use &c.) Useful--a person. 2 Busy, diligent, industrious; ever engaged in some work.

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kāmī (कामी).—a S (-mī-minī-mi) Lustful, libidinous, amorous: also wishful or desirous. Ex. patiprīti- kāmī nasē pāpakāmī asī tē ahā pāvalēṃ śāpa kāṃ mī||.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kamī (कमी).—a Deficient, wanting, short.

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kāmī (कामी).—a Lustful, amorous. Desirous.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kāmi (कामि).—A libidinous man, lecher. -f. Name of Rati.

Derivable forms: kāmiḥ (कामिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāmi (कामि).—m.

(-miḥ) A libidinous man, a lecher. f.

(-miḥ) A name of Rati the wife of Kama. E. kam to desire, ki affix; the pen. becomes long.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kami (कमि).—(±dhātu) [masculine] the root kam.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kāmi (कामि):—[from kāma] 1. kāmi m. a lustful or libidinous man, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] f. Name of a Rati (wife of Kāma), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] 2. kāmi (in [compound] for kāmin).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāmi (कामि):—(miḥ) 2. m. A libidinous man.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kami in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Kamī (कमी):—(nf) deficiency; shortage, paucity, lack, want, scarcity, scantiness; abatement; defect; failing; reduction.

2) Kāmī (कामी):—(a) sexually crazy, libidinous, amorous.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Kāmi (कामि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Kāmin.

2) Kāmi (कामि) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Kāmin.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kāmi (ಕಾಮಿ):—

1) [noun] a man excessively interested in, desirous of, indulging in, sexual enjoyment.

2) [noun] (gen.) a man having a desire (for something).

3) [noun] Rati, the wife of Kāma.

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Kāmi (ಕಾಮಿ):—[adjective] desiring; wishing.

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Kāmi (ಕಾಮಿ):—

1) [noun] 1) any bird of the family Columbidae having plump body and small head; pigeon.

2) [noun] any of various small birds of the family Emberizidae; the house sparrow.

3) [noun] the ruddy goose considered to be a pattern of conjugal attachment.

4) [noun] Śiva.

5) [noun] a man excessively submissive to his wife; an uxorious man.

6) [noun] the moon.

7) [noun] the Supreme Being.

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Kāmi (ಕಾಮಿ):—[noun] (dial.) a domesticated female cat.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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