Jvalat: 4 definitions

Introduction:

Jvalat means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Jvalat (ज्वलत्) [=Jvala?] refers to “blazing”, according to the Kularatnoddyota, one of the earliest Kubjikā Tantras.—Accordingly, “[...] (The gross form has) five faces, ten arms and, pure, it has a smiling face. [...] Her stomach is thin, navel, deep set and thighs large. (Her) hips and knees are very soft. She has beautiful thighs and red finger (nails) that are very beautiful. She (wears) beautiful cloths, a divine garland and an excellent shawl. (She wears) a necklace made of large gems, bangles on her limbs [i.e., kaṭaka-aṅgada], anklets and a blazing diadem of rubies [i.e., jvalat-mukuṭa-māṇikyā]. O supreme mistress, adorned with divine rings (on her fingers), she sits on a svastika (as her) seat”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Jvalat (ज्वलत्) refers to “blazing (flames)”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.18 (“Description of the perturbation caused by Kāma”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated: “When Kāma did not secure any entry within the great Yogin, he became deluded and frightened much through the magical power of Śiva. Who could gain access to Śiva in meditation, who could fix an eye in his forehead that resembled fire with shooting blazing flames [i.e., jvalat-jvāla-agnisaṅkāśa]? In the mean time Pārvatī came there along with her two maids and brought various kinds of flowers for Śiva’s worship. [...]

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jvalat (ज्वलत्).—mfn. (-lan-lantī-lat) 1. Burning, blazing. 2. Shining, radient, brilliant. E. jval to burn, śatṛ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jvalat (ज्वलत्):—[from jval] mfn. [present participle] √jval q.v.

2) [v.s. ...] m. blazing fire, flame, [Kāmandakīya-nītisāra]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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