Prajvalat: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Prajvalat means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Prajvalat in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Prajvalat (प्रज्वलत्) refers to “that which burns”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “The venerable sacred seat of Jālandhara is in the locus of the cavity (of the mouth). It is adorned with flames of Fire and shines brilliantly and burns [i.e., prajvalat] with the Doomsday Fire in the form of a (radiant) spark (of light). The venerable Cakrīśanātha is the emperor in the middle of the wheel (located here) and is mounted on the power of his knowledge surrounded by many troupes of Yoginīs and is adorned with sixteen energies. (This is the) second sacred seat should be known by means of (the deity’s) energy (to be) within the locus of the cavity shining (there) surrounded by a tree, creeper, guardian, cremation ground, monastery, gesture and cave”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Prajvalat in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Prajvalat (प्रज्वलत्) refers to “that which is dazzling”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.15 (“The penance and reign of Tārakāsura”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated: “Then that Varāṅgī, devoted to him, conceived. The child within her body developed in many years with its brilliance. That Varāṅgī, when the time was complete, delivered of a son of huge body and great strength dazzling [i.e., prajvalat] the ten quarters. At the same time, several phenomena of evil portent forboding misery and distress happened, when the son of Varāṅgī was born making the gods miserable. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Prajvalat in Shaivism glossary
Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Prajvalat (प्रज्वलत्) refers to “blazing (fire)”, according to the Svacchanda-tantra.—Accordingly, [verse 4.8-13, while describing auspicious dreams]—“[The dreamer] crosses over the ocean and river. Likewise sunrise and indeed blazing fire (prajvalatprajvalantaṃ hutāśanam) [are auspicious. Also auspicious is when the dreamer] sees planets, constellations, stars and the disk of the moon. [When the dreamer] ascends the palace or a turret of the palace, climbs a mountain top, tree, elephant, young animal, bull, horse, or man. [In auspicious dreams one] sees a chariot and also sees the siddhamantra, obtains the perfected oblation and sees the gods, etc. [...]”

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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