Harasvamin, aka: Harasvāmin, Hara-svamin; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Harasvamin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Katha (narrative stories)

Harasvamin in Katha glossary... « previous · [H] · next »

Harasvāmin (हरस्वामिन्) is the name of a Brāhman whose story is told in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 24 by King Paropakārin to her daughter Kanakarekhā in order to demonstrate that “people are particularly fond of blackening the character of one distinguished”. Accordingly, “there is a city on the banks of the Ganges named Kusumapura, and in it there was an ascetic who visited holy places, named Harasvāmin. He was a Brāhman living by begging; and constructing a hut on the banks of the Ganges, he became, on account of his surprisingly rigid asceticism, the object of the people’s respect”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Harasvāmin, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
context information

Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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Relevant definitions

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Agrahara
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Khahara
Khahara (खहर).—a. having a cypher for its denominator.Khahara is a Sanskrit compound consisting...
Dashahara
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Haradasa
Haradāsa is one of the Brāhmaṇa donees mentioned in the “Asankhali plates of Narasiṃha II” (130...
Ardhahara
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Mulahara
Mūlahara (मूलहर).—a. uprooting completely; सोऽयं मूलहरोऽनर्थः (so'yaṃ mūlaharo'narthaḥ) Rām.6.4...
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