Dindima, Diṇḍima, Dimdima: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Dindima means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Google Books: Cultural History from the Vāyu Purāna

Diṇḍima (दिण्डिम): a Musical Instrument.—It is not mentioned in the Vedic literature, but the Jātakas have it. The Rāmāyaṇa says that it had a leather facing. The Vāyu-purāṇa information is the same as in the case of Bherī.

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Ḍiṇḍima (डिण्डिम) refers to a type of “battle-drum”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.36. Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“on hearing these words of Dakṣa. the gods including Indra set off immediately in their readiness to fight. [...] Conchs were blown. Drums were beaten in that great war festival. Battle drums were sounded both big and small [viz., ḍiṇḍima]. Being encouraged by that sound, the devas in the company of the guardians of the quarters hit and thrashed the attendants of Śiva”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Diṇḍima (दिण्डिम).—A war-musical instrument.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 138. 56; Mā. 40. 24.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Diṇḍima (दिण्डिम) refers to a musical instrument, first mentioned in Nāṭyaśāstra 4.253, after Śiva danced using Recakas and Aṅgahāras, and Pārvatī performed a ‘gentle dance’.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Dimdima in India is the name of a plant defined with Carissa carandas in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Echites spinosus Burm.f. (among others).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Indian J. Med. Res. (1963)
· Bot. Cab. (1822)
· Pakistan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences (1993)
· Repertorium Specierum Novarum Regni Vegetabilis (1912)
· Mantissa Plantarum (1767)
· Cell and Chromosome Research (1986)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Dimdima, for example side effects, extract dosage, health benefits, diet and recipes, chemical composition, pregnancy safety, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Dindima in Pali glossary
Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Dindima, (nt.) (Sk. ḍiṇḍima, cp. dundubhi) a musical instrument, a small drum J.VI, 580; Bu I.32. See also deṇḍima. (Page 322)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ḍiṇḍima (डिण्डिम).—m.

(-maḥ) 1. A musical instrument, a kind of small drum or tabor. 2. A plant, bearing a small fruit, (Carissa carandas:) (pānaāmalā) see kṛṣṇapāka. E. ḍiṇḍi imitative sound, a din, and ma what emits, from mi, with ḍa aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ḍiṇḍima (डिण्डिम).—m. A kind of drum, [Rāmāyaṇa] 5, 13, 49.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ḍiṇḍima (डिण्डिम).—[masculine] a kind of drum (also ā & [neuter]); humming, sound.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Ḍiṇḍima (डिण्डिम) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—Somavallīyogānanda prahasana. Taylor. 1, 82. 334.

2) Ḍiṇḍima (डिण्डिम):—the author of the Somavallīyogānanda prahasana, see Aruṇagirinātha.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ḍiṇḍima (डिण्डिम):—m. a kind of drum, [vii, ix; Harivaṃśa] (once f(). , [14836]), [Rāmāyaṇa v; Kathāsaritsāgara] (once n., [xci, 23]) etc. (ifc. f(ā). , [Amaru-śataka])

2) great noise, murmuring, clamour, loud assertion, [Kādambarī; Bālarāmāyaṇa; Vikramāṅkadeva-carita, by Bilhaṇa] (-tva n. abstr.) etc.

3) Carissa Carandas, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) mfn. humming, [Kādambarī ii, 154.]

5) Dindima (दिन्दिम):—m. Name of a man, [Horace H. Wilson]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ḍiṇḍima (डिण्डिम):—(maḥ) 1. m. A musical instrument, kind of drum or tabor; a plant (Carissa carondas).

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Ḍiṇḍima (डिण्डिम) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Ḍiṃḍima.

[Sanskrit to German]

Dindima in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Ḍiṃḍima (डिंडिम) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Ḍiṇḍima.

2) Ḍiṃḍima (डिंडिम) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Ḍiṇḍima.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Ḍiṃḍima (ಡಿಂಡಿಮ):—[noun] a kind of small drum.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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