Bhutanatha, Bhūtanātha, Bhuta-natha: 9 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Bhutanatha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Bhutanatha in Shaivism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

Bhūtanātha (भूतनाथ) is the name of a teacher to whom the Kāpālika doctrine was revelead, mentioned in the Śābaratantra. The disciple of Bhūtanātha is mentioned as being Kanthādhārin. The Śābara-tantra is an early tantra of the Kāpālika sect containing important information about the evolution of the Nātha sect. It also lists the twelve original Kāpālika teachers (eg., Bhūtanātha). Several of these names appear in the Nātha lists of eighty-four Siddhas and nine Nāthas.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Bhutanatha in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Bhūtanātha (भूतनाथ) and Bhūtamātṛ refers to the pair of God and Goddess appearing in the fifteenth Kalpa (aeon), according to the Kularatnoddyota.—Chapter nine of the Kularatnoddyota opens with the goddess asking how the Kula tradition (kulāmnāya) will be worshipped along with its mantras and Vidyās and who will bring it down (avatāraka) into the world in the various cosmic aeons (kalpa). After explaining that it is brought down into the world by incarnations or aspects of both the god and the goddess (aṃśamātra), the god goes on to list the names of these aspects—a goddess and her consort [i.e., Bhūtamātṛ—Bhūtanātha]—in nineteen aeons (kalpa), many of which we recognize from the earlier version in the Tantrasadbhāva.—(cf. Jayadrathayāmala-tantra of the Kāpālikas).

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Bhutanatha in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bhūtanātha (भूतनाथ).—an epithet of Śiva; तद् भूतनाथानुग नार्हसि त्वम् (tad bhūtanāthānuga nārhasi tvam) R.2.58.

Derivable forms: bhūtanāthaḥ (भूतनाथः).

Bhūtanātha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms bhūta and nātha (नाथ).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhūtanātha (भूतनाथ).—m.

(-thaḥ) Siva. E. bhūta a spirit of element, and nātha lord.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Bhūtanātha (भूतनाथ) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—poet. See Prājñabhūtanātha.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bhūtanātha (भूतनाथ):—[=bhūta-nātha] [from bhūta > bhū] m. ‘lord of beings or spirits’, Name of Śiva, [Raghuvaṃśa; Caṇḍa-kauśika]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of a poet, [Catalogue(s)]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhūtanātha (भूतनाथ):—[bhūta-nātha] (thaḥ) 1. m. Shiva.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Bhūtanātha (भूतनाथ):—[(bhūta + nātha)] m. der Gebieter über die Gespenster, Beiname Śiva’s [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 199,] [Scholiast] [Śabdaratnāvalī im Śabdakalpadruma] [Raghuvaṃśa 2, 58.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Bhūtanātha (भूतनाथ):—m. der Gebieter über die Gespenster , Beiname Śiva’s [Kṣemīśvara’s Caṇḍakauśika 75,14.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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