Aksharapankti, Akṣarapaṅkti, Akshara-pankti: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Aksharapankti means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Akṣarapaṅkti can be transliterated into English as Aksarapankti or Aksharapankti, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

[«previous (A) next»] — Aksharapankti in Vyakarana glossary
Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Akṣarapaṅkti (अक्षरपङ्क्ति).—Name given to the dvipada virāj verses divided into padās of five syllables. cf विराजो द्विपदाः केचित् सर्वा आहुश्चतुष्पदाः । कृत्वा पञ्चाक्षरान्पादांस्तास्तथा (virājo dvipadāḥ kecit sarvā āhuścatuṣpadāḥ | kṛtvā pañcākṣarānpādāṃstāstathā)Sक्षरपङ्क्तयः (kṣarapaṅktayaḥ) R. Pr. XVII. 50.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

Discover the meaning of aksharapankti or aksarapankti in the context of Vyakarana from relevant books on Exotic India

Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

[«previous (A) next»] — Aksharapankti in Chandas glossary
Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

1) Akṣarapaṅkti (अक्षरपङ्क्ति) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (e.g., akṣara-paṅkti) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

2) Akṣarapaṅkti (अक्षरपङ्क्ति).—While giving the definition of the metre akṣarapaṅkti (5 letters in each pāda), the author of the Vṛttamaṇimañjūṣā defines the guru and laghu-varṇas of the metre. He says that a pāda in which the first, fourth and fifth are guru and others (second, third) are laghu, that metre is known as akṣarapaṅkti metre.

Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

Discover the meaning of aksharapankti or aksarapankti in the context of Chandas from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous (A) next»] — Aksharapankti in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Akṣarapaṅkti (अक्षरपङ्क्ति).—a. 1. having 5 syllables (paṅkti = Gr. pentas-five) सु मत् पद् वग दे इत्येष वै यज्ञोऽक्षरपङ्क्तिः (su mat pad vaga de ityeṣa vai yajño'kṣarapaṅktiḥ) Ait. Br. (tānyetānyakṣarāṇi hotṛja- pādau prayoktavyāni).

2) Name of a metre of four lines (dvipadā virāj) each having five syllables (one dactyl and one spondee).

Akṣarapaṅkti is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms akṣara and paṅkti (पङ्क्ति).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akṣarapaṅkti (अक्षरपङ्क्ति).—[feminine] [Name] of a metre.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Akṣarapaṅkti (अक्षरपङ्क्ति):—[=a-kṣara-paṅkti] [from a-kṣara] mfn. containing five syllables

2) [v.s. ...] f. Name of a metre of four lines, each containing one dactyl and one spondee, [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā]

3) [v.s. ...] also called paṅkti or haṃsa.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of aksharapankti or aksarapankti in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: