Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

On connected with the reprover and the reproved

Kd.19.5.3 “Lord, in how many ways may remorse be caused in a monk who reproves according to what is not the rule?” Vin.2.250

Upāli, in five ways[1] may remorse be caused in a monk who reproves according to what is not the rule. One says: ‘The venerable one reproved at a wrong time, not at a right time—you have need for remorse.[2] The venerable one reproved about what is not fact, not about what is fact—you have need for remorse. The venerable one reproved with harshness, not with gentleness … with what is unconnected with the goal, not with what is connected with the goal … with inner hatred, not with a mind of loving-kindness—you have need for remorse.’ Upāli, in these five ways may remorse be caused in a monk who reproves according to what is not the rule. What is the reason for this? To the end that no other monk might think that one might be reproved about what is not fact.”

Kd.19.5.4 “But, Lord, in how many ways may no remorse be caused in a monk who has been reproved according to what is not the rule?”

“Upāli, in five ways may no remorse be caused in a monk who has been reproved according to what is not the rule. One says: ‘The venerable one reproved at a wrong time, not at a right time—you have no need for remorse.[3] The venerable one reproved … with inner hatred, not with a mind of loving-kindness—you have no need for remorse.’ Upāli, in these five ways may no remorse be caused in a monk who has been reproved according to what is not the rule.”

Kd.19.5.5 “Lord, in how many ways may no remorse be caused in a monk who reproves according to rule?”

“In five ways,[4] Upāli, may no remorse be caused in a monk BD.5.349 who reproves according to rule. One says: ‘The venerable one reproved at a right time, not at a wrong time—you have no need for remorse. The venerable one reproved … not with inner hatred, but with a mind of loving-kindness—you have no need for remorse’. In these five ways, Upāli, may no remorse be caused in a monk who reproves according to rule. What is the reason? To the end that another monk should think that one should be reproved about what is fact.”

Kd.19.5.6 “But, Lord, in how many ways may remorse be caused in a monk who has been reproved according to rule?”

“In five ways, Upāli, may remorse be caused in a monk who has been reproved according to rule. One says: ‘The venerable one reproved at a right time, not at a wrong time—you have need for remorse. The venerable one reproved … not with inner hatred, but with a mind of loving-kindness—you have need for remorse’. Upāli, in these five ways may remorse be caused in a monk who has been reproved according to the rule.”

Kd.19.5.7 “Lord, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, having attended to how many states within himself may he reprove the other?”

“Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, having attended to five states within himself, he may reprove the other: compassion, seeking welfare, sympathy, removal of offences, aiming at discipline. Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, having attended to these five states Vin.2.251 within himself, he may reprove the other.”

“But, Lord, in how many mental objects should there be support for a monk who has been reproved?”

“Upāli, there should be support in two mental objects for a monk who has been reproved: in truth and in being imperturbable.”[5]

Told is the Ninth Section: that on suspending the Pātimokkha.

In this section there are thirty items. This is its key:

On an Observance so long as a depraved monk does not depart,
BD.5.350 Urged off[6] by Moggallāna, a wonder, in the conqueror’s instruction, /
Deepens and gradual training, fixed (and) do not transgress,
(with) a corpse (and) the Order suspends, streams (and) they lose, /
Streams (and) they attain nibbāna, and the one taste is freedom,
many (and) dhamma and discipline too, (great) beings and the eight ariyan men:[7] /
Having made it like the ocean, he tells of excellence[8] in the teaching.
Pātimokkha on an Observance day, “no one knows about us,” /
“In case,” they looked down upon.
One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, and nine and ten. /
(One of) moral habit, good habits, right views and mode of livelihood—the four disciples,
defeat and entailing a Formal Meeting, of expiation, that ought to be confessed, /
Wrong-doing among the fivefold divisions as they are,
and falling away from moral habit and good habits,
and with what has not been done and has been done[9] in the six divisions as they are, /
And about defeat and entailing a Formal Meeting, a grave offence and one of expiation
and likewise one that ought to be confessed and one of wrong-doing and one of wrong speech, /
Falling away from moral habit and good habits
and falling away from right views and mode of livelihood,
and those eight dones and not dones with one as to moral habit, good habits, right views, /
Also not dones and dones and likewise the done and not done
are likewise spoken of as ninefold by the system[10] in accordance with fact, /
BD.5.351 Defeated, still going forward and likewise one who has disavowed,
he submits, he withdraws acceptance, talk on withdrawing acceptance and whoever /
falls away from moral habit and good habits, and likewise as to falling away from right views,
seen, heard, suspected, the tenfold, this he should know. /
A monk sees a monk, and another tells what he has seen,[11]
a pure one tells him of it himself:[12] he suspends the Pātimokkha. /
If it removes itself on account of a danger—kings, thieves, fire, water and
human beings and non-human beings and beasts of prey and creeping things,
to life, to the Brahma (faring)—/
Because of a certain one of the ten, or as to one among the others,
and he should know just what is legally valid, what is not legally valid as it accords with the way. / Vin.2.252
The right time (and) according to fact (and) connected with the goal, “I will attract,” “There will be,”
Conduct of body and speech, loving-kindness, great learning,[13] both. /
He should reprove at the right time, about fact, with gentleness, about the goal,[14] with loving-kindness.[15]
As a speech should dispel remorse caused by what is not the rule /
It dispels the remorse of one who reproves or who is reproved according to rule.
Compassion, seeking welfare, sympathy, removal, aiming at—/
The conduct for one reproving is explained[16] by the Self-awakened One.
And the proper course for the reproved one is in the truth as well as in being imperturbable. Vin.2.253

Footnotes and references:

1.

Cf. AN.iii.197.

2.

Here presumably the reprover is being spoken to.

3.

Here the one reproved is being spoken to.

4.

Cf. AN.iii.198.

5.

akuppa, being free from anger, immovable. Cf. AN.iii.198, which slightly elaborates the thoughts a reproved monk might have.

6.

niccuddo. Should this be nicchuddho (from nicchubhati) as in Sinhalese reading? Oldenberg suggests nicchuddo = nicchudito. Siamese edition reads nicuttho with variant reading nicchuddo.

7.

The ariyan men are those who follow Gotama’s teachings, his disciples. The “eight” are the classes of those who attain stream-winning, once-returning, no return and arahantship and the fruits of these four ways.

8.

guṇaṃ. Sinhalese reads guṇā.

9.

Sinhalese and Siamese read, more correctly, akatāya katāya ca for Oldenberg’s text’s akatā katāya ca.

10.

ñāyato, Sinhalese edition reading jānatā.

11.

Text: vipass’ añño cārocati; Sinhalese edition: añño cārocayā taṃ; Siamese edition: añño cārocayāti taṃ.

12.

Text: taṃ suddheva tassa akkhāti. Oldenberg suggests at Vin.2.326 taṃ sv’ eva tassa akkhāti. Sinhalese and Siamese editions read suddho va tassa akkhāti.

13.

bāhusaccaṃ. Oldenberg suggests at Vin.2.326 bāhusuccaṃ. But bāhusacca = bahussuta at e.g. Kd.19.5.1. The word also occurs at MN.i.45; AN.i.38 (bahu- should here read bāhu-), AN.ii.218; Vin.3.10; Kp.p.3. It is explained at MN-a.iii.156 = Khu-a.134 as bahussutabhāva, the condition of having heard much.

14.

Sinhalese edition reads attamettena for Oldenberg’s and Siamese edition’s atthamettena.

15.

Sinhalese edition reads attamettena for Oldenberg’s and Siamese edition’s atthamettena.

16.

pakāsitā in Sinhalese and Siamese editions, and as suggested by Oldenberg, Vin.2.326, instead of text’s pakāsitaṃ.