Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Things to be reviewed by a reprover

Kd.19.5.1 “Lord, if a monk is reproving,[1] willing to reprove another, when he has considered how many states within himself may he reprove the other?”

BD.5.346Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, when he has considered five states within himself may he reprove the other. Upāli, when a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, he should consider thus: ‘Now, am I quite pure in bodily conduct,[2] am I possessed of pure bodily conduct, flawless, faultless? Is this state found in me, or not? ‘If, Upāli, this monk is not quite pure in bodily conduct, is not possessed of bodily conduct that is quite pure, flawless, faultless, there will be those who will say to him: ‘Please do you, venerable one, train yourself as to body’—thus will those say to him.

“And again, Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, he should consider thus: ‘Now, am I quite pure in the conduct of speech, am I possessed of conduct in speech that is quite pure, flawless, faultless? Is this state found in me, or not?’ If, Upāli, that monk is not quite pure in the conduct of speech … ‘Please do you, venerable one, train yourself as to speech’—thus will those say to him.

“And again, Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, he should consider thus: ‘Now is a mind of loving-kindness, without malice towards my fellow Brahma-farers, established in me? Vin.2.249 Is this state found in me, or not?’ If, Upāli, a mind of loving-kindness, without malice towards his fellow Brahma-farers, is not established in the monk, there will be those who will say to him: ‘Please do you, venerable one, establish a mind of loving-kindness towards your fellow Brahma-farers’—thus those will say to him.

“And again, Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, he should consider thus: ‘Now, am I one who has heard much, an expert in the heard, a storehouse of the heard? Those things which are lovely at the beginning, lovely in the middle, lovely at the ending, and which, with the spirit, with the letter, declare the Brahma-faring utterly fulfilled, wholly purified—are such things much heard by me, learnt by heart, repeated out loud, pondered upon, carefully attended to, well penetrated by vision?[3] Now, is this state found in me, or not?’ If, Upāli, the monk has not heard much … if such BD.5.347 things have not been … well penetrated by vision, there will be those who will say to him: ‘Please do you, venerable one, master the tradition’[4]—there will be those who speak thus to him.

“And again, Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, he should consider thus: ‘Now,[5] are both the Pātimokkhas properly handed down[6] to me in detail, properly sectioned, properly regulated, properly investigated clause by clause, as to the linguistic form? Is this state found in me, or not?’ If, Upāli, the two Pātimokkhas are not properly handed down to the monk in detail … as to the linguistic form, and if they say: ‘Now where, your reverence, was this spoken by the Lord?’[7] and if questioned thus he is not able to explain, there will be those who will say to him: ‘Please do you, venerable one, master discipline’—there will be those who speak thus to him. Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, when he has considered these five states within himself, he may reprove the other.

Footnotes and references:

1.

Cf. AN.v.79ff., addressed to “monks.”

2.

Cf. MN.ii.113.

4.

āgama; here in opposition to vinaya, see next clause. On āgatāgama, one to whom the tradition has been handed down, see BD.3.71, n.1.

5.

As at Vin.4.51 (BD.2.266, where see notes), and above Kd.14.14.19.

6.

āgatāni; cf. āgatāgama and suttāgata at e.g. Vin.4.144 (BD.3.43, n.5).

7.

Vin-a.1289 explains, “in which town was this rule of training spoken by the Lord?”—thus making “where” refer to locality and not to context.

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: