Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

On the four great references

Kd.6.40.1 Now at that time scruples arose in the monks as to this and that occasion, thinking: “Now, what is permitted by the Lord? What is not permitted?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Whatever, monks, has not been objected to by me, saying: ‘This is not allowable’, if it fits in with what is not allowable, if it goes against what is allowable, that is not allowable to you. Whatever, monks, has not been objected to by me, saying: ‘This is not allowable’, Vin.1.251 if it fits in with what is allowable, if it goes against what is not allowable, that is allowable to you. And whatever, monks, has not been permitted by me, saying: ‘This is allowable’, if it fits in with what is not allowable, if it goes against what is allowable, that is not allowable to you. Whatever, monks, has not been permitted by me, saying: ‘This is allowable if it fits in with what is allowable, if it goes against what is not allowable, that is allowable to you.”

Kd.6.40.2 BD.4.348 Then it occurred to monks: “Now, is (food that may be eaten) during a watch of the night[1] allowable with (food that may be eaten) during a short period,[2] or it is not allowable? Now, is (food that may be eaten) during seven days[3] allowable with (food that may be eaten) during a short period or is it not allowable? Now, is (food that may be eaten) during life[4] allowable with (food that may be eaten) during a short period or is it not allowable? Now, is (food that may be eaten) during seven days allowable with (food that may be eaten) during a watch of the night or is it not allowable? Now, is (food that may be eaten) during life allowable with (food that may be eaten) during a watch of the night or is it not allowable? Now, is (food that may be eaten) during life allowable with (food that may be eaten) during seven days or is it not allowable?” They told this matter to the Lord.

Kd.6.40.3 He said: “Monks, (food that may be eaten) during a watch of the night with (food that may be eaten) during a short period is allowable at the right time[5] on the day it is accepted; it is not allowable at the wrong time.[6] Monks, (food that may be eaten) during seven days with (food that may be eaten) during a short period is allowable at the right time on the day it is accepted; it is not allowable at the wrong time. Monks, (food that may be eaten) during life with (food that may be eaten) during a short period is allowable at the right time on the day it is accepted; it is not allowable at the wrong time. Monks, (food that may be eaten) during seven days with (food that may be eaten) during a watch of the night is allowable in a watch of the night on the day it is accepted; it is not allowable after the watch of the night is ended. Monks, (food that may be eaten) during life with (food that may be eaten) during a watch of the night is allowable in a watch of the night on the day it is accepted; it is not allowable after the watch of the night is ended. Monks, (food that may be eaten) during life with (food that may be eaten) during seven days BD.4.349 is allowable for (the length of) seven days; it is not allowable after the seven days are ended.”

The Section on Medicines: the Sixth

In this Section the items are one hundred and six items. This is its key:

In the autumn, also at the wrong time, tallow, roots,
(they had need of) what was pounded off,
of astringent decoctions, leaves,
fruits, resin, salt, and dung, /
chunam, sifter,[7] and flesh, ointment, powder, ointment-box,
all kinds,[8] not covered,[9] sticks, case for sticks, /
A bag, strap at the edge, thread, oil for the head, and the nose,
nose-spoon, and steam, a pipe, and a lid, a bag,[10] /
Decoction of oil, and strong drink,
too much, an ointment, a vessel,
sweating, and all kinds of herbs,
thereupon the great (sweating), hemp-water, /
Water-vat, and blood, a horn, foot-unguent, foot-salve, lancet,
and astringent (water), sesamum paste, a compress, / Vin.1.252
Piece of cloth, and mustard-powder, fumigation, and crystal,
oil for the sore, linen bandage,
and the irregular things, and what is (formally) received, /
A (decoction of) dung, is making,
and mud turned up by the plough,
lye, urine and yellow myrobalan, perfumes, and a purgative,
clarified, unprepared, prepared-unprepared, /
Meat-broth, (mountain-) slope,
monastery attendant, and for seven days,[11]
sugar, kidney-bean, sour gruel,
cooking for oneself, one may cook again,[12] /
He allowed it however,[13] short of almsfood,
and fruit, sesamum, solid food,
before a meal, fever, and discharged, an ulcer, /
BD.4.350 And clyster-treatment and Suppi(yā),[14] and indeed human flesh,
elephants, horses, and a dog, a snake, lion, tiger, leopard, /
And the flesh of bears (and) hyenas, and a turn, and conjey,
a certain one who was young, sugar, Sunidha, rest-house, /
And Ambapālī, the Licchavis, the Ganges,
the Koṭi(gāma) talk on truths,
killed on purpose,
he objected when (they were) well off again for food, /
A cloud, Yasoja, and Meṇḍaka, products of the cow,
and provisions for a journey,
Keni(ya), mango, rose-apple, plantain,
banana, honey, grape, edible lotus root, /
Phārusakas, vegetables, flour, the barber at Ātumā,
fruit and seed at Sāvatthī,
and On what occasion?, as to the right time. Vin.1.253

Footnotes and references:

1.

yāmakālika, see BD.2.330, n.1. These “foods” really refer to medicines.

2.

yāvakālika, see BD.2.330, n1I.

3.

sattāhakālika, see BD.2.330, n.2.

4.

yāvajīvika, see BD.2.330, n.3.

5.

Before noon from sunrise.

6.

After noon until sunrise, Vin.4.86, Vin.4.166.

7.

Reading here cālinī, above cālanī.

8.

Reading here ucca-parutā.

9.

Reading here ucca-parutā.

10.

Reading thavi. Sinhalese edition reads yamakatthavī, double bag Kd.6.13.2.

11.

Sinhalese edition ārāmā satā pañcahi, referring to the five hundred monastery attendants of Kd.6.15.4.

12.

punā pace, replacing the punapakā of Kd.6.17.6.

13.

punānuññāsi.

14.

Reading Suppi, as below Koti and Keni.

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